Favorite films

  • Body Heat
  • Blade Runner
  • Cabaret
  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

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  • Come Back Peter

    ★★★

  • Gasoline Alley

    ★★★

  • The White Cat

    ★★½

  • In the Hands of Impostors (No. 2)

    ★★½

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  • Come Back Peter

    Come Back Peter

    ★★★

    Modest, lightweight British B-movie featuring a cast of forgotten actors (if, in fact, they were ever known) in a series of sit-com situations. Middle-aged mum and dad Charles Lamb and Katharine Boutall decide to downsize when their three kids fly the coop only for them all to return with their young families the moment their parents move in to their humble two-bed detached in Dorking. Inevitable cramped sleeping arrangements and queues for the bathroom follow. Instantly forgettable but likeable enough - and a lot better than many low-budget British movies of the time.

  • Gasoline Alley

    Gasoline Alley

    ★★★

    A lightweight, inoffensive screen version of the popular cartoon strip - the first of a short-lived series of two - featuring Hollywood bad boy Scotty Beckett as Corky Wallet. Not exactly a laugh-out-loud comedy, but pleasant enough to raise a few smiles. Quite how nobody has hit on the idea of making a film about Beckett's remarkable life is a mystery.

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  • The Invisible Man Returns

    The Invisible Man Returns

    ★★★

    The Invisible Man Reappears would seem to be a more appropriate title but, as Claude Rains’ character failed to survive past the first movie’s end credits, a new character must relive his ordeal. Step forward a young Vincent Price, whose tones are even more distinctive than his predecessors, and who descends into madness with camp flamboyance. He’s supported by a decent cast that is led by Cedric Hardwicke and Cecil Kellaway, two thorns either side of the rosy Nan Grey,…

  • Hell's House

    Hell's House

    ★★½

    Hell’s House is an independent picture which has the feel of a Warner Brothers product, not only because it stars Warner refugees Bette Davis and Pat O’Brien but because of the crime and prison – or reform school – subject matter. Although Davis and O’Brien headline, it’s the ill-fated Junior Durkin, playing a good kid who ends up in reform school, who has most of the screen time. A pacey and tough drama that stands up well to the second-tier features churned out by the majors.