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  • Nappily Ever After

    Nappily Ever After

    ★½

    #52FilmsByWomen, Part II: Film #3

    Sanaa Lathan delivers an emotionally sincere performance, but for a film that wants to encourage women to embrace their natural beauty, it's honestly deeply sad how Nappily Ever After comes off as more shallow and judgmental than it does empowering, never allowing itself to go into much deeper and more interesting territory and instead insisting on playing things safe and uninspired.

  • Halloween

    Halloween

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Hooptober 5.0 Film #36
    TASK #3: Six decades!

    It's official: David Gordon Green made Halloween awesome again. This is not only the best Halloween film in a very long time but also the best since John Carpenter's original. This has everything I wanted in a Halloween film and more. Jamie Lee Curtis gives the best performance of her career as Laurie Strode and I absolutely love the way Green, Danny McBride, and Jeff Fradley wrote her character. Rob Zombie wishes

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  • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

    Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

    ★½

    With its intense and exciting action sequences, excellent performances (with the exception of a laughable turn from Jesse Eisenberg), and dazzling visual spectacle being let down by an overstuffed and incoherent script that's filled to the brim with poorly written characters and needlessly convoluted plotting, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice tries to be another Batman reboot, a Man of Steel sequel, and a Justice League set-up all at once with results that are nothing short of depressing to watch.…

  • Arrival

    Arrival

    ★★★★★

    Yet another terrific entry in director Denis Villeneuve's filmography, Arrival is one of the most intelligent, visually stunning, and thought-provoking science fiction films in recent memory, led by a career-best performance from Amy Adams and a pensive, poignant screenplay by Eric Heisserer.