Favorite films

  • Fanny and Alexander
  • In the Mood for Love
  • Close-Up
  • Du côté d'Orouët

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  • The Revenge: A Scar That Never Disappears

    ★★★½

  • Beautiful Thing

    ★★★★

  • A Zed & Two Noughts

    ★★★★

  • Panic in High School

    ★★★½

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  • The Revenge: A Scar That Never Disappears

    The Revenge: A Scar That Never Disappears

    ★★★½

    It seems fitting that my journey through Kurosawa’s career so far* ends with one of his most bleakly Beckettian visions; Anjo’s all-consuming thirst for revenge for his wife’s death five years earlier just becoming an especially violent way of being stuck. Ideals abandoned long ago, he’s found no new meaningful ones with which to replace them, existing in some no man’s land between the law’s morally rigid impotence and the yakuza’s winner-takes-all nihilism. “To catch outlaws, you have to go…

  • Beautiful Thing

    Beautiful Thing

    ★★★★

    Gorgeously scrappy and lived-in, where too many films about young LBGTQ love are happy to define their characters only by their queer identities, sending them swiftly along some premanufactured assembly line out of the closet. Firmly rooted in the realities of class as much as sexuality, the world of Ste and Jamie’s South East London council estate is brought to life as a teeming, maddening place of so many people piled on top of one another; too many broken dreams…

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  • Titane

    Titane

    ★★½

    Clearly, I’m in the minority here, but it’s the sort of transgressive provocation I just find incredibly dull, if not flat-out useless. As with Raw before it, the sensationalist genre trappings just become a way for Ducournau to avoid having to try to say anything about any emotional depths she might’ve wandered into. Indeed, literally nothing of either Alexia’s narrative trajectory or Vincent’s emotional awakening would change at all if her baby had been made of flesh and blood instead…

  • Nomadland

    Nomadland

    ★★★

    A twilight-hued ode to one of the many communities left abandoned by the grotesque corporatization of American government; a society where communities to belong to and houses to live in are considered privileges rather than fundamental human rights, and the tragically unnecessary courage of those who have to create their own communities and find their own places to call home. “No, I’m not homeless,” Fern insists. “I’m just houseless. Not the same thing, right?” Whether working alongside the new class…