jsforman

jsforman

Pro

All my favorite singers couldn’t sing.

Favorite films

  • Yi Yi
  • The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
  • A Brighter Summer Day
  • Graveyard of Honor

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  • Malignant

    ★★½

  • To Live

    ★★★★½

  • Dirty Work

    ★★★

  • Wild at Heart

    ★★★★★

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  • As It Fades

    As It Fades

    My self promotions on here are all starting to sound the same, and with nothing truly new or unique to add about this short (I feel like it kind of speaks for itself), I want to formally invite all my letterboxd pals to the online premiere of As It Fades on Friday August 27th at 8:00 PM EST. You’re welcome to live comment your thoughts here in the comment section. Watch here.

    *WARNING: it’s real spooky kind of (and also could send someone with photosensitive epilepsy into a seizure)*

  • Yi Yi

    Yi Yi

    ★★★★★

    This is Yang’s (literal) reflection on life and death in a modernized Taiwan. His characters occupy these claustrophobic places; trapped between door frames, or in the reflection of a glass window pane. City lights oftentimes dominate the frame in these shots, seemingly suggesting a lost sense of community/self within the community that comes with Taiwan’s urbanization. Then there’s Ota — I think back specifically to the scene where Ota is first introduced. Once his presentation is finished, the blinders are…

Recent reviews

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  • To Live

    To Live

    ★★★★½

    Still cannot comprehend my Chinese Cinema professor’s stance on the CCP

  • Wild at Heart

    Wild at Heart

    ★★★★★

    Has informed my sensibilities as a filmmaker (or at least what I strive to be) more than any other film I can recall and maybe most beautiful piece of art I’ve ever seen? It just keeps getting better Every time I see it!

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  • Tiptoes

    Tiptoes

    ½

    “Have you ever been sexually active with a little person?”
    “Oh you know, just kid stuff.”

    WHAT

  • Native Son

    Native Son

    ★★

    Let me preface this by saying Richard Wright’s 1940 novel “Native Son” is one of my favorites. Deeply complex and endlessly heartbreaking in its delivery, Wright’s exploration of black fear and self-hatred carved its every haunting word into my brain, to the point where I can recall lines word-for-word without having picked up the book in over two years. After finishing it, I sat down with my dad to talk about it, and I remember asking if there had been…