Favorite films

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Hana

    Hana

    A film that redefines the falling cherry blossoms' association with the samurai tradition. What Kore-eda does here is examine the validity of the samurai philosophy of revenge, violence and associated monetary/financial outcomes. A pacifist film, where education dominates over swordplay. The lead performers are endearing, so is the Renaissance type music composed by Jun Kawabata. The production design is laudable. A film that parallels William Fraker's oft forgotten "Monte Walsh" (1970) which looked at the Westerns and the lifestyles of its heroes. Kore-eda adds wistful comedy, while Fraker dealt with wistful nostalgia. Both deal with changing values and economies.

  • Ophélia

    Ophélia

    Chabrol adapts Shakespeare's Hamlet--complete with Laurence Olivier's film Playing in the local theatre. Ivan sees himself as Hamlet and his good male friend as Horatio and his parent's trustworthy village friend as Ophelia's father. Complete with a grave digger digging up an used grave and a film replacing the play within a play. The only difference Ophelia does not die but lives to be Hamlet's love in life. Chabrol's twist is that Hamlet misread his uncle who claims he never…

Popular reviews

More
  • Mirror

    Mirror

    Many have reviewed this masterpiece. Yet it is important to keep in perspective the real life family members of Tarkovsky. This helps the viewer to understand the subtle details in the film. My detailed review of the film attempts to do just that at moviessansfrontiers.blogspot.in/2013/06/146-russian-maestro-andrei-tarkovskys.html

  • Conversation Piece

    Conversation Piece

    On a second viewing after a 35 year gap, I am convinced this is indeed a lovely work and a major work of Visconti. This is is also one of those rare films that an actor--Burt Lancaster--helped a director to make a great film. (One recalls Kirk Douglas prevailing on Stanley Kubrick to change the ending of Paths of Glory, only to make it a major work of cinema). Here, Burt Lancaster, staked his own money to complete the film…