A Band Called Death

A Band Called Death ★★★½

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

This review may contain spoilers.

Punk music isn't one of my favorite genres. I like my music to sound nice and generally not assault me. But whatever, because like most music docs A Band Called Death goes perhaps a little too far in praising the focus of the film. Death consisted of three brothers from Detroit who were making punk music two years before The Ramones. Also, they're black. Between the proto-punk sound, the color of their skin, and the name of the band they never broke through into any real success. One of the brothers left the band and that was that. Death ended. That brother died years later and then, years after that, Death was discovered thanks to collectors and the internet. The kids of one of the brothers form a kind of neo-Death and perform the Death songs live to a clamoring audience. Death reunites and goes on tour and everybody is happy. It's pretty standard stuff. Interesting enough but not groundbreaking. It feels like a long 90 minutes, with the history of the band taking up a full half of that running time. I found the discovery process more exciting and seeing how the surviving brothers react to the dead brother's premonition of the band's discovery coming true was perhaps the best part of the film. There's not much going on by way of cool moviemaking either. Searching for Sugar Man is a very similar film but at least that one has the cool music videos interspersed throughout all the talking heads. There's also the brothers' enthusiasm to consider. Both seem to be very outgoing and gregarious and their passion is clear and infectious. Maybe fans of the music might find more to this film. For me it was merely good, not great.

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