RSS feed for KateSherrod
  • The Wizard of Lies

    The Wizard of Lies

    ★★½

    For all its star power, this film isn't a patch on Madoff, which featured Richard Dreyfuss and Blythe Danner in the roles Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer phoned in here (Pfeiffer's exaggerated accent really jars compared took Danner's natural speech). Meh.

  • Too Big to Fail

    Too Big to Fail

    ★★★½

    A Planet Money podcast enacted by A list actors, Too Big to Fail focuses on Treasury Secretary ( and former Goldman Sachs executive) Hank Paulson, depicting him as the adult in the room, if not an actual hero. I take some issue with that.

    Excellent performances all around, though, and the writers did a good job making boring but important events interesting and understandable.

    Occupy should have burned it all down.

  • My Scientology Movie

    My Scientology Movie

    ★★★★

    I actually prefer this one too Going Clear in artistic terms. I like the device of simultaneously telling a story and showing us how you're telling the story (e.g. casting/auditions, discussions about logistics, etc). The tension between the filmmaker and his primary source was especially interesting and absorbing. I didn't learn anything new, but I got a new way of experiencing what I'd learned elsewhere. A good effort.

  • Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles

    Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles

    ★★★½

    A friend just revealed he was almost in this movie as an expert on the (now stolen or destroyed) tiles in St. Louis, so I had to watch this again. I saw one in NYC when I was a teenager. Fond memory.

  • Pontypool

    Pontypool

    ★★★★

    Be sure to watch all the way to the end of this most cerebrally strange of horror films. A straight up adaptation of the novel would probably not be as eerily effective as setting it in a radio station. An inspired choice!

  • John Dies at the End

    John Dies at the End

    ★★★★

    I'm a fan of the books and find this a satisfying adaptation of the first one, changes and all.

  • Wonder Woman

    Wonder Woman

    ★★★★

    Zac Snyder needs to go, but even he couldn't ruin this film, which lives up to all the hype, positive and negative.

  • The Marquise of O

    The Marquise of O

    ★★★★½

    A German language film about a widowed Italian Marquis (Edith Clever, who is glorious) who falls mysteriously pregnant and is reduced to placing a newspaper announcement to find the unknown father, and the Russian Count (Bruno Ganz, dashing and dreamy and just a tad creepy) who once rescued her during a military attack ( which he led and in which he defeated her father), this was my first and still favorite Eric Rohmer film and I'm delighted to find it…

  • Fires on the Plain

    Fires on the Plain

    ★★★★★

    There are so many shocking and striking scenes that it's a whole separate kind of wonder that these brutal set pieces also make up a narrative. The strafing, the bit with the boots, the revelation that it's not monkey... Holy shit, this film.

  • Europa

    Europa

    ★★★★

    This visually striking, often beautiful, film opened my eyes to a situation I'd never really given much thought to -- what life was like in Germany immediately following WWII. The sense of shock and of guilt, the material deprivation and devastation... It's all thrown into sharp relief here as our hero, a German-American pacifist, returns to Germany to work as, of all things, a train conductor. His travels being him into the orbit of a prominent industrial family as well…

  • Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator

    Love Affair, or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator

    ★★★★

    The intervals with sexologists, criminologists and coroners will make it hard not to think of Rocky Horror at times, but this earthy, off-kilter case study of the " modern" (1967) city girl in, maybe Sarajevo?, is very much its own thing. Eva Ras is so adorable that today they'd cast her as Supergirl, while Slobodan Aligrudnic has a sweet, undernourished charm of his own. What stole the film for me, though, was the setting, a city beyond the Iron Curtain…

  • The Element of Crime

    The Element of Crime

    ★★★★★

    Some of the most elegant and imaginative super - impositions and transitions grace this dreamy, sepia -toned mystery of a film. Combine this with the quiet and turgid narration from a main character recalling events under hypnosis and you have a compulsively watchable movie. The plot is beside the point, or could be if it weren't so intriguing.

    The occasional flashes of blue-green light throw it all into hyper- reality.

    And then there's the sort of Greek chorus commentary of the Egyptian hypnotist's remarks...

    The only film I can compare it to is Hearts of Glass. Fantastic. Six out of five stars.