Favorite films

  • The Awful Truth
  • All the President's Men
  • L'Eclisse
  • Miami Vice

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  • Jurassic Park

    ★★½

  • No Way Out

    ★★★★

  • Atlantis: The Lost Empire

  • That Darn Cat!

    ★★

Recent reviews

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  • Jurassic Park

    Jurassic Park

    ★★½

    No lie, it’s 2022 and this is the very first time I’ve ever seen this movie, and in fact it’s the only installment in this franchise that I’ve ever watched. I’ve just never been interested enough in dinosaurs, or in Steven Spielberg’s sentimentality traps, to bother. I have to admit, the director’s many suspenseful set pieces that are expertly placed throughout this two hour festival of “Ooohhss” and “Aaahhs” make it fairly diverting. And I enjoyed the performances from Neill, Dern,…

  • No Way Out

    No Way Out

    ★★★★

    I was inspired to rewatch this after listening to Jamelle Bouie’s podcast, in which this movie is largely dismissed as terrible. When I was a kid I thought it was a crackerjack little thriller, so I wanted to go back and see if I had been misled by youthful naïveté. Not at all. This movie is still superb, even with all of its 80s-era imperfections. It’s clearly a critique of Reagan-era political power, and all of the principals both embody…

Popular reviews

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  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

    Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Way, way back in “Episode V," when Darth Vader revealed himself to Luke Skywalker as his father, it felt like an earthquake. Suddenly a deep, telling connection was revealed, and it totally changed the way we understood the story being told.

    In J.J. Abrams’s monumentally stupid “Episode IX,” _everything_ is connected, everyone is related to everyone else, and it couldn't be less surprising, less impactful, because when everything is meant to be important, nothing is. Abrams has perverted the whole…

  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★★

    I'm so happy that Asian-American cinema is a legit real thing now, and that we have roles like these for Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan. But I'm less happy about how pastiche cinema has become a substitute for genuine invention—I'm not sure I need another genre mashup exercise where the directors wear their influences as conspicuously on their sleeves as this. This movie doesn't even feel like sub-Tarantino fare to me; it's sub-Edgar Wright-ian, really, and that's not a…