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  • Wonder Woman

    Wonder Woman

    ★★★★½

    The difference in quality between this and all the other DC universe movies so far is staggering. I was worried that, at 2 hours 20, this would be too long, but it really does rattle along. The characters are layered and believable, the plot well paced, and the action intense and visceral, never relying on CGI too heavily except for the last 30 seconds of the climax.

    More than anything, what’s so good about Wonder Woman is what it stands…

  • The Red Turtle

    The Red Turtle

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    It's a beautifully animated film, for sure, and the way it's told without dialogue is a lovely throwback to the universal appeal of silent cinema.

    But... and I know I'm in a minority here.. the story just didn't work for me.

    It's about a man who beats up a turtle and then shags it.

    Once I'd thought about it that way, I just couldn't let myself be washed away by the charm which others have found in it.

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  • Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

    Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

    So damn manly.

    Men going around smashing other men. Big muscly scary men. Pulling each other's eyes out, throwing them through windows, kicking them in the manhood. The manliest place to kick a man.

    Sure, the women get to jump around and have fun murdering too – "strong female characters"? – no, they're without exception motivated, defined even, by the big muscly scary men they're in love with.

    Nothing original, nothing emotional, nothing clever. Lots of face-smashing.

    It looks nice, though.

  • Her

    Her

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Spike Jonze’s tale of a lonely man falling in love with his operating system is not one to go and see if you’re feeling lonely – Joaquin Phoenix’s Theodore Twombly is lonely at the start and ends it lonely. Even his computer leaves him.

    It’s not incredibly upsetting, just relentlessly downbeat. Not in an inert, cold way, as some critics have accused it – at least no more than it's getting across the lead character's own emptiness. I see it…