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Leading distributor of international, documentary, independent and classic films dedicated to cinematic excellence in our theatrical and home video releases.

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Stream Genre Hits for Free on Kino Cult

On the eve of spooky season, Kino Lorber is thrilled to introduce Kino Cult, a free ad-supported streaming destination for lovers of horror and cult films! Featuring hundreds of hours of curated genre favorites, all in high definition and with new titles added monthly, Kino Cult offers a deep dive into unapologetically weird cinema, blending recent genre indies with hundreds of outrageous midnight movies and grindhouse gems.

Recent reviews

A hardworking Maltese fisherman, Jesmark is faced with an agonizing choice. He can repair his leaky luzzu – a traditional, multicolored wooden fishing boat – in the hopes of eking out a meager living at sea for his wife and newborn son, just as his father and grandfather did before him. Or he can decommission it in exchange for an EU payout and cast his lot with a sinister black-market operation that is decimating the Mediterranean fish population and the…

Master filmmaker Kiyoshi Kurosawa (Pulse, Cure, Tokyo Sonata) won the Silver Lion (Best Director) at the Venice Film Festival for this riveting, gorgeously crafted, old-school Hitchockian thriller shot in stunning 8K. The year is 1940 in Kobe, on the eve of the outbreak of World War II. Local merchant and amateur filmmaker Yusaku (Issey Takahashi, Kill Bill) senses that things are headed in an unsettling direction. Following a trip to Manchuria, he becomes determined to bring to light the things…

The brilliant work, personal struggles, and cultural impact of iconic American writers Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams explodes onto the screen in this innovative dual-portrait documentary. Filmmaker Lisa Immordino Vreeland masterfully collages a wealth of archival material, including dishy talk show appearances with Dick Cavett and David Frost, with clips from some of the duo’s most memorable movie adaptations: A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Glass Menagerie, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and In Cold Blood. Featuring…

Lydia Lunch: The War Is Never Over by Beth B is the first career-spanning documentary retrospective of Lydia Lunch’s confrontational, acerbic and always electric artistry. As New York City’s preeminent No Wave icon from the late 70’s, Lunch has forged a lifetime of music and spoken word performance devoted to the utter right of any woman to indulge, seek pleasure, and to raise voice in a rage as loud as any man. The film frames Lunch’s work through the lens…

Liked reviews

Wife of a Spy

Wife of a Spy

★★★★½

Really interesting how the digital filmmaking here sits in contrast to its use of classical techniques (i.e. blocking, backlights, very set bound). It's a tension wherein the digital textures re-inforce and -double the whole theme of the constructed nature of images and identity. Everybody's caught up in and pushing against another's story (e.g. the nation's, the military's, a spy's, a wife's). Of course, the real centre of this is Satoko and Yusaka's mutual efforts to insert or remove her from…

Slalom

Slalom

★★★½

on its initial surface, Slalom seems to take the main route of a typical sports drama. rigorous training, negative encouragement, and jealous schoolmates thicken the pressure to win ski races and the distantly simmering, uneasy maternal relationship. but it glides and slips to other territories, wrapped up in its wintry weather and saddled by the continuous snowfall, where abuse materialises at the hands of the trainer. for some of us craving for appreciation and attention we endlessly look for, it's…

The coldest and most unforgiving movie about skiing this side of “Downhill Racer” — and just as fascinated by the loneliness of bombing down the slopes with the world at your back — Charlène Favier’s “Slalom” is a familiar story of sexual abuse, but one told with such bracing intensity that it snaps across your face like a blast of cold mountain air. From the opening moments of her debut feature, Favier pivots between powerlessness and control with the same…

Bill Traylor was born a slave in 1853 on a cotton gin plantation outside Montgomery Alabama with seventeen other slaves. During the final days of the civil war, Traylor saw the Union army destroying local infrastructure and crops which was effective but to a fault since Southerners further detested the Union. The Northern troops weren’t there to liberate the slaves, they just wanted to restore the Union. Finally, after the War, Traylor’s family was freed from bondage but thrust into…