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Martin Scorsese on Miklós Jancsó

Martin Scorsese shared some thoughts about Miklós Jancsó in honor of Kino Lorber's release of six films by the Hungarian master, restored in 4K from their original camera negatives by the National Film Institute Hungary – Film Archive. These films are now playing at the Metrograph in New York before touring select cities and coming to Digital, Blu-ray, and DVD in April 2022.

Stream Genre Hits for Free on Kino Cult

On the eve of spooky season, Kino Lorber is thrilled to introduce Kino Cult, a free ad-supported streaming destination for lovers of horror and cult films! Featuring hundreds of hours of curated genre favorites, all in high definition and with new titles added monthly, Kino Cult offers a deep dive into unapologetically weird cinema, blending recent genre indies with hundreds of outrageous midnight movies and grindhouse gems.

Recent reviews

Panah Panahi, son and collaborator of embattled Iranian master Jafar Panahi, makes a striking feature debut with this charming, sharp-witted, and deeply moving comic drama. HIT THE ROAD takes the tradition of the Iranian road-trip movie and adds unexpected twists and turns. It follows a family of four – two middle-aged parents and their sons, one a taciturn adult, the other an ebullient six-year-old – as they drive across the Iranian countryside. Over the course of the trip, they bond…

Berlin, 1931. Jakob Fabian works in the advertising department of a cigarette factory by day and drifts through bars, brothels and artist studios with his wealthy and debauched friend Labude by night. When Fabian meets the beautiful and confident Cornelia, he manages to shed his pessimistic attitude for a brief moment and falls in love. Not long after, he falls victim to the great wave of layoffs sweeping the city, plunging him back into a depression, while Cornelia’s career as…

The first and only narrative feature by American documentarian James Blue (Oscar-nominated for A Few Notes On Our Food Problem), THE OLIVE TREES OF JUSTICE holds the dual distinctions of being the only French film to have been shot during the Algerian War, and to have been the inaugural winner of the Critics prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1962.

Filmed in Algiers and the surrounding countryside during the late stages of the Algerian War, under the pretext that…

In this portrait of parental sacrifice and the love of a father for his son, former wrestler Kakhi (played by real-life Olympic champion Levan Tediashvili) embarks on a journey from his home in the Republic of Georgia to visit his son Soso (Giorgi Tabidze) in the Russian-speaking neighborhood of Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. There he finds him living in a shabby boarding house populated by a colorful group of fellow Georgian immigrants. Soso is not studying medicine, as Kakhi believed, but…

Liked reviews

Wife of a Spy

Wife of a Spy

★★★★½

Really interesting how the digital filmmaking here sits in contrast to its use of classical techniques (i.e. blocking, backlights, very set bound). It's a tension wherein the digital textures re-inforce and -double the whole theme of the constructed nature of images and identity. Everybody's caught up in and pushing against another's story (e.g. the nation's, the military's, a spy's, a wife's). Of course, the real centre of this is Satoko and Yusaka's mutual efforts to insert or remove her from…

Slalom

Slalom

★★★½

on its initial surface, Slalom seems to take the main route of a typical sports drama. rigorous training, negative encouragement, and jealous schoolmates thicken the pressure to win ski races and the distantly simmering, uneasy maternal relationship. but it glides and slips to other territories, wrapped up in its wintry weather and saddled by the continuous snowfall, where abuse materialises at the hands of the trainer. for some of us craving for appreciation and attention we endlessly look for, it's…

The coldest and most unforgiving movie about skiing this side of “Downhill Racer” — and just as fascinated by the loneliness of bombing down the slopes with the world at your back — Charlène Favier’s “Slalom” is a familiar story of sexual abuse, but one told with such bracing intensity that it snaps across your face like a blast of cold mountain air. From the opening moments of her debut feature, Favier pivots between powerlessness and control with the same…

Bill Traylor was born a slave in 1853 on a cotton gin plantation outside Montgomery Alabama with seventeen other slaves. During the final days of the civil war, Traylor saw the Union army destroying local infrastructure and crops which was effective but to a fault since Southerners further detested the Union. The Northern troops weren’t there to liberate the slaves, they just wanted to restore the Union. Finally, after the War, Traylor’s family was freed from bondage but thrust into…