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  • Captain Fantastic

    Captain Fantastic

    ★★★

    Yeah, sure, Viggo Mortensen can be fantastic. Thin premise, difficult to plant for sure, and the screenplay really, really tries; credit where credit's due? "This is your fault" doesn't seem like a real thing that's said, though: it seems like a perfect, pure thing somebody writes down that they think would be said to them, right? Perfection and purity are the name of the game here, and that's not necessarily a compliment.

    I appreciate how CAPTAIN FANTASTIC's super-ideal communistic life…

  • Kongo

    Kongo

    Wow. Even for a pre-Code darkness-flirting savage take like this, I expected more like Conrad's Heart of Darkness than like just a dimmed NAUGHTY MARIETTA. Jesus. Walter Huston plays Deadlegs -- great, boffo name, but such a lame character you need to roll your eyes at. The next year Huston had GABRIEL OVER THE WHITE HOUSE, a few years after that DODSWORTH, and then TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE. KONGO's a remake of 1928's silent WEST OF ZANZIBAR, directed by…

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  • Fanny & Alexander

    Fanny & Alexander

    ★★★

    Maybe it's because I watched the 3-hour version and not the 5-hour one, but it surprises me that Fanny hardly appears in the film at all... and Alexander is central, but not dominant in the least. Odd that something titled with two characters' names would hardly feature those characters at all. Regardless, this is a great piece of art, hefty and extensive but never overwhelming.

    It surveys a privileged Swedish family, the Ekdahls, as they work through the unhappiness following…

  • Patton

    Patton

    ★★★★

    Whether you think PATTON is informed more by WWII and Patton in profile (Nazis, etc.) or by Vietnam and America in context (hippies, etc.) may speak to what kind of fucked up person you are. Discussing war, observing the devastation, wryly pondering doing away with it… "Just like your poetry, it isn't part of the twentieth century" an acolyte tells Patton, and he agrees and says "The world grew up" with a bittersweet sadness. From a script co-written by Francis…