Favorite films

  • Ratatouille
  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  • I Know Where I'm Going!
  • Synecdoche, New York

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All
  • Blue Velvet

    ★★★

  • Sans Soleil

    ★★★★½

  • Paris, Texas

    ★★★½

  • L'Argent

    ★★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Blue Velvet

    Blue Velvet

    ★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    I think I might have bought this on its terms—that is, as a film with a fundamentally conservative view of sexual pleasure that nonetheless gets and concedes the allure of "wrong" sex, and is more interesting for that than an outright sex-positive film might be—if Jeffrey ever showed even an inkling of being into the violence. My problem with Blue Velvet is not that it equates virginal blondes giving speeches in front of churches to good and horniness/promiscuity/BDSM to evil;…

  • Sans Soleil

    Sans Soleil

    ★★★★½

    Chris Marker knows, to his immense chagrin, that no "objective reality" can ever really be unearthed by a filmmaker. He's suspicious of himself, unsure of whether he can say anything of value about the popular experiences and the esprit du temps of Japan and Guinea-Bissau or really any other place. He lives in a world where 1968 has been autopsied, autopsies of 1968 have been autopsied, and the leftist drive to perform autopsies of autopsies has been autopsied—and he doesn't…

Popular reviews

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  • Bohemian Rhapsody

    Bohemian Rhapsody

    I want to say something to this film's young queer fans. (Buckle up, 'cause this will be long and full of links.)

    I see you. Your love for this movie is valid. Never before in history has a movie with an openly queer protagonist played on 3000 screens in the US, let alone grossed over half a billion dollars internationally—that we've gotten this far is momentous and worth celebrating. I see your admiration for Freddie and his artistry; I'm just…

  • Green Book

    Green Book

    The reason Green Book works on some people—other than the fact that not everyone knows/cares about its self-serving bastardization of history—is that it's a skillful feat of misdirection.

    Imagine this: a guy wants to make a movie about his father, a rascally, larger-than-life working-class Bronx type. He wants to dramatize one of the old man's irresistible tall tales, and he sensibly opts for the one with self-evident cinematic potential; the time his father's life intersected with that of an important…