Favorite films

  • Wings of Desire
  • Pan's Labyrinth
  • Apocalypse Now
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey

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  • Promising Young Woman

    ★★★★

  • Free Guy

    ★½

  • The Babadook

    ★★★★

  • Beckett

    ★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Moon Man

    Moon Man

    ★★★½

    An eccentric and offbeat animation, Stephan Schesch’s The Moon Man is the heartwarmingly simple yet original tale of the eponymous Moon Man’s adventure to and from earth, where he finds a pleasingly-cartoonish power hungry President of Earth as foe but most of all the meaning of friendship amongst its playfully drawn inhabitants.

    The film begins in a starrily lit drive-in movie , as a girl and father happily promise to come re-see the ‘incredible’ picture that’s just closed. As their…

  • The White Balloon

    The White Balloon

    ★★★½

    For many viewers of World Cinema, Jafar Panahi is a name most appositely connected with his home imprisonment in his home country of Iran for “propaganda” related crimes against the Islamic Republic, and subsequent meta-textual ode to cinema This Is Not a Film which was short listed for Best Documentary at the 2012 Academy Awards. His debut feature, The White Balloon however, is a charming tale following a young girl, Razieh’s attempts to buy a Goldfish whose ‘chubby’ and many-finned…

Popular reviews

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  • Submarine

    Submarine

    Submarine Dir: Richard Ayoade Cast : Craig Roberts, Jasmine Paige, Noah Taylor, Sally Hawkins, Paddy Consandine
    8/10
    As may have been said else-where, Submarine mirrors Richard Ayoade's foremost acting characteristics in making an artistic virtue out of self-consciousness, an asset out of affectation. However, he stands apart from such philistines at NME who announce him as the coolest man in the UK and other meaningless platitudes in that there has always seemed something authentic in his self aware artifice.

    Craig…

  • The Miners' Hymns

    The Miners' Hymns

    ★★★★

    It’s difficult with films which are at once so singular yet seemingly abstract as Bill Morrison’s beautiful The Miners’ Hymns, to not find yourself clinging on to reference to other films, however familiar or novel they may be in comparison. In this case, one can find a melancholy myriad of sources which provide you with the means to place The Miners’ Hymns in a cinematic landscape. In its celebration of working class rituals, it feels similar to Terence Davies’ elegiac…