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  • Rollergator

    Rollergator

    ½

    Rollergator is, by all acounts, one of the most baffling things I have ever seen that barely registers as a film. It's got a narrative, a byline for which the events go along in order to resemble some sort of outline towards where a story will go. The problem is that it is so inept in its basic storytelling, that trying to just sit and look at what is happening on screen begins to feel like a fever dream. Minutes…

  • A Dog's Will

    A Dog's Will

    ★★

    Among the night terrors that go on in the comment section of Letterboxd's top 250 Narrative films of all time (such recent highlights include people not understanding how an average works and complaining they're favorite film isn't on it, people complaining that there are non-American films on that list, numerous debates over whether or not Into the Spider-Verse really is one the best films ever made, and incels. Someone best described it as a "hellish cesspool", and that's a pretty…

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  • Under the Skin

    Under the Skin

    ★★★★★

    Watched with three friends of mine (Eric, Brandon, Andrew) (3/4)

    Under the Skin is an incredibly cryptic film that refuses to make things abundantly clear to the viewer, choosing instead to give a skeleton of an idea that sticks with the viewer that is a foundation for further understanding of the material contained within, a true viewpoint of the human race from another being's perspective, complete with the beauty and horror that makes it as enriching as it is. It…

  • Midnight in Paris

    Midnight in Paris

    ★★★½

    Well now this is more like it.

    Woody Allen finally taps into a certain charm that, for me, had been long absent since my first encounter with him through Annie Hall that left me feeling satisfied with the work that he had done. Perhaps it's me coming to grips with the mild take on surrealist high-concepts he does that don't necessarily take advantage of their full potential, but work for the microcosmic stories Allen tells? Perhaps it's the natural beauty…