RSS feed for Lincoln

Favorite films

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Frankenstein

    Frankenstein

    ★★★★

    ~~ History of Horror Day 2 of 31 ~~

    Short and sweet, 1931's Frankenstein breathes life into author Mary Shelley's monstrous creation. Although this film released less than a decade after the undeniably dated Nosferatu, the immediately apparent leap in technology and production value was mind-blowing. The world feels alive and energized. Outdoor sets are occupied with crowds of extras who operate as a collective, whether dancing or angry mobbing. Boris Karloff looks and plays the part of Frankenstein's monster…

  • Nosferatu

    Nosferatu

    ★★★★

    ~~ History of Horror Day 1 of 31 ~~

    A snoozefest turned spectacular once Max Schreck appears on screen. His chilling portrayal of Count Orlok in the labeled Acts II-V make stark juxtaposition of the monotonous and exposition-heavy first. A constantly stewing fear of his whereabouts propels the film forward, and it earns all the credit in the world for bordering on a century old and yet still keeping me permanently fixed on the edge of my seat.
    Now the…

Popular reviews

More
  • Baby Driver

    Baby Driver

    ★★½

    A young adult takes performance enhancing drugs to help him become the best getaway driver in town. The only thing is, these are ingested sonically.

    Baby Driver has an interesting premise, and it thankfully manages to deliver on the essentials such a premise would bring about - an alluring protagonist, thrilling car chase sequences, and of course a catchy soundtrack. The film becomes more of a mixed bag, however, when you delve past the basics.

    Ansel Elgort is excellent in…

  • In the Mood for Love

    In the Mood for Love

    ★★★★★

    In the Mood for Love is subtly stunning, portraying the complexities of fleeting and forbidden love through tranquil simplicity. Director Wong Kar-wai maneuvers through the film while demonstrating a fair amount of moderation, preserving an aura of practicality. He is faced time and time again with a splitting road and consistently traverses the modest route over the more lavishly extravagant one. The film is ironically elevated by this grounded approach.

    Painting a love story requires far more than a coat…