Manuel Palma Cornejo

Manuel Palma Cornejo

International Relations student. Art passionate, essayist, free thinker and film critic at Rotten Tomatoes and Letterboxd

Favorite films

  • Persona
  • Melancholia
  • Mysterious Skin
  • Synecdoche, New York

Recent activity

All
  • Thirteen Days

    ★★★½

  • The Last Black Man in San Francisco

    ★★★★

  • The Irishman

    ★★★★

  • For Sama

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Thirteen Days

    Thirteen Days

    ★★★½

    The Cold War went through several stages of great tension. One of them, perhaps the one with the most friction between the USSR and the United States, was the missile crisis. Occurred in 1962, the event marked diplomatic relations between the two powers, but it was also an important watershed in reconsidering prudence and sanity as determining values in the midst of the political chaos that often drives Washington mad. US foreign policy is clear: respond with an attack on…

  • The Last Black Man in San Francisco

    The Last Black Man in San Francisco

    ★★★★

    "The Last Black Man in San Francisco" is a film that pays tribute to this beautiful city of California and is a tribute to the friendship of two people who have grown there all their lives. They have witnessed innumerable good and bad experiences within a transformative and tireless space in which all kinds of people have passed and where events have happened that together make up what the city is. So in this story San Francisco is alive, it…

Popular reviews

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  • Midori

    Midori

    "Midori" or "The Camellia Girl" is a medium-length film with 48 minutes of visual torture and violently banal pornography. In its first minutes the depressive story of Midori (voice of Minako Naka) is told. She is a girl who due to the death of her father and the illness of her mother, spends her time selling camellias through the streets of a small town in the imperial Japan at the end of the 19th century. Upon hearing her story, a…

  • Call Me by Your Name

    Call Me by Your Name

    ★★★★★

    When I entered the movie theater I already had an idea of the movie I was about to watch. My dad accompanied me, and I just told him: "it will be a romantic drama". Neither he nor I measured that we were about to see something of the size that "Call Me by Your Name" represents. Watching the movie, we smiled so much, sobbing, arguing, pointing, and even shouting. When we finished we were happy and we knew that, as…