Mirror

"It is with something clean and precise that you will force the attention of inattentive eyes and ears." - Robert Bresson.

"Mirror" is probably (but it's anyone's guess) best described as a memory play. Except even that is not strictly true to the film's sense. It's totally unavailable to paraphrase. Description won't really help either, except to say that I've seen things here I don't think I'll be able to forget, and that I certainly don't want to forget. It's a film that makes you revisit those memories of yours that you find substantive and moving (and maybe you've no idea why) and asks you to ennoble them with thought. But by the time you've introspected the film has moved on to a new and more oblique emotional landscape, multiplying in strangeness at each new sight, and you're always going to be playing catch-up. I've felt a number of emotions over the film's running time, not one of which I can quite verbalise; but I feel bewildered, I feel somewhat thrown off balance, and most importantly, I feel moved.