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  • Intruder

    Intruder

    ★★

    The directorial debut of critic and novelist Sohn Won-pyung has been billed as the year’s “most intense mystery thriller”, but she doesn’t appear to have gleaned much inspiration from her time writing for Korean film journal Cine 21. Intruder is contrived, derivative and relentlessly dumb from the off. Kim Mu-yeol plays Seo-jin, a recently widowed architect who is struggling to manage his grief while juggling work and caring for his young daughter (Park Min-ha). He is determined to find the…

  • #Iamhere

    #Iamhere

    ★★★

    Recalling Steven Spielberg’s The Terminal, in which Tom Hanks played an East European refugee marooned at New York’s JFK airport, Eric Lartigau’s #Iamhere sees a French chef become an unlikely internet sensation after he is stood up at Seoul’s Incheon airport. Korean actress Bae Doona has a cameo as the protagonist’s elusive quarry in this well-meaning and intermittently successful romantic comedy.
    Read on: www.scmp.com/lifestyle/entertainment/article/3091011/iamhere-film-review-bae-doona-plays-object-frenchmans

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  • Cross of Iron

    Cross of Iron

    ★★★★★

    Peckinpah's only war movie is also one of his best. James Coburn stars as the anti-authoritarian German sergeant, looking out for his men on the cold Eastern Front, while his imbecilic superior (Maximilian Schell) chases the elusive Iron Cross. Beautifully shot and filled with the violence and camaraderie synonymous with the director's work this rarely gets the praise it deserves as one of Hollywood's most profound meditations on the futility of war.

  • When a Woman Ascends the Stairs

    When a Woman Ascends the Stairs

    ★★★★★

    Takamine Hideko is absolutely devastating as the ageing geisha in 60s Ginza faced with the difficult decision of whether to marry one of her rich customers or set up a bar of her own. Already a widow burdened with debts, derision and illness, Mama becomes a symbol of women's battle for independence in post-war Japan. Naruse's direction is unobtrusive and stylishly laid back, accompanied by a breezy jazz soundtrack symbolising the city's complacency to the plight of our heroine.