Favorite films

  • Baby Face
  • Design for Living
  • Blonde Venus
  • Waterloo Bridge

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  • Day for Night

    ★★★★★

  • The Man Who Loved Women

    ★★★½

  • Scott of the Antarctic

    ★★★½

  • Superman

    ★★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Million Dollar Mermaid

    Million Dollar Mermaid

    ★★★

    The film the expression “splashy musicals” was made for.

  • Song of the South

    Song of the South

    ★★½

    Walt Disney wants a piece of the “Gone with the Wind” pie and creates a misguided fairytale version of the antebellum, where white folks can sure rely on the magical storytelling and singing power of their black servants as a cushion for their middle class worries. It is all bathed in soft focus mawkish sentimentality (and some admittedly attractive Technicolor cinematography courtesy of Gregg Toland), but not enough to disguise that there is no black stereotyping left unturned - this…

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  • Khartoum

    Khartoum

    ★★★½

    Quentin Tarantino indirectly led me to this film - the programme for the 70mm roadshow presentation of "The Hateful Eight" proclaimed it was the first film since "Khartoum" to be shot in UltraPanavision. Timing was also on my side as this was made available on Netflix the very same week. And then to my surprise the same timing also played an ironic and much less amusing trick: one of the very first scenes in the film depicts the fanatic Islamic…

  • Black Narcissus

    Black Narcissus

    ★★★★★

    “The Sound of Music” showed that the nunxploitation subgenre could be wrapped into a wholesome package and commercialised to family audiences. But if you are a creature of cinema, this is the real deal - this is Val Lewton’s LSD Technicolor dream come true if he ever had access to that kind of money. Lurid and delirious, watch as repressed desire, the jungle drums, the weight of colonialist guilt and David Farrar’s hairy chest make poor unsuspecting nuns fall from vertiginous heights into deadly matte paintings to meet their untimely fate.
    Screened at the BFI from a lush dye-transfer Technicolor print dripping with sensualité.