Matt Levine

Writer, film critic, rabid movie lover, record purchaser in the Twin Cities area.

Favorite films

  • The Vampires or, The Arch Criminals of Paris
  • City Lights
  • Paris, Texas
  • Letter from an Unknown Woman

Recent activity

All
  • The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent

    ★★★

  • The Scary of Sixty-First

    ★★★½

  • Petite Maman

    ★★★★

  • One Sings, the Other Doesn't

    ★★★★½

Recent reviews

More
  • The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent

    The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent

    ★★★

    Pretty much irresistible. Nicolas Cage and Pedro Pascal are somehow able to make the movie’s central friendship sincere and affecting. Tiffany Haddish is entirely wasted unfortunately. If you’re going to make a postmodern, winkingly self-referential star comedy, this is probably the way to do it.

  • The Scary of Sixty-First

    The Scary of Sixty-First

    ★★★½

    One of the roughest and most audacious horror debuts I’ve seen in a long time, which is both the best and worst thing about it. Two women rent a loft apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and soon learn it was one of Jeffrey Epstein’s sex lairs; wild conspiracy theories and possible demonic possession ensue. It’s an abrasive mishmash of Eyes Wide Shut, Rosemary’s Baby, and of-the-moment hot-button-issue-prodding; I’m very glad it exists even if (or especially because) it’s messy and off-putting.

Popular reviews

More
  • The Power of the Dog

    The Power of the Dog

    ★★★★★

    The best 2021 movie I've seen so far: a gorgeous, haunting, unpredictable pseudo-Western about the lengths we go to to protect those we love.

    Jane Campion is one of the best directors working today, and here she creates another masterwork to go along with "The Piano," "An Angel at My Table," "Top of the Lake," etc. With her native New Zealand filling in for Montana in the 1920s, "The Power of the Dog" reimagines the majestic vistas that John Ford…

  • Cat People

    Cat People

    ★★★★½

    Maybe the best example in cinematic history of doing so much with so little, primarily depending on subtlety and suggestion to make the most of a small budget (courtesy of RKO’s B-movie department). Of course, that could describe most of Val Lewton and Jacques Tourneur’s collaborations. In a running time barely more than an hour, Cat People fits in a story about psychoanalysis and repressed female sexuality, a fascination with the ways that social and personal traumas have lingering aftereffects,…