Matthew J. White

Matthew J. White

Scholar of cinema. Lover of film and culture.

Favorite films

  • Days of Heaven
  • The Godfather: Part II
  • Vagabond
  • Vertigo

Recent activity

All
  • Where Is My Friend's House?

    ★★★★★

  • One Second

    ★★★★

  • The Crime of the Century

    ★★★★½

  • The Pursuit of Love

    ★½

Recent reviews

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  • Where Is My Friend's House?

    Where Is My Friend's House?

    ★★★★★

    The first of Abbas Kiarostami's "Koker Trilogy", 1987's Where Is My Friend's House? is the greatest film I have seen this year.

    Set in what was then modern day Iran in a small village called Koker and its surroundings, the film tells the tale of a boy who discovers that he has accidentally brought home a fellow student's notebook and his attempt to return it to its rightful owner. Since there is danger of the fellow student being expelled if…

  • The Great Museum

    The Great Museum

    ★★★

    Quite nice, but Frederick Wiseman did it much better.

Popular reviews

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  • Mad Max: Fury Road

    Mad Max: Fury Road

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Few films I've seen recently have been as breath-taking and endlessly action-filled as George Miller's "Mad Max: Fury Road". It certainly keeps you riveted to the screen for its entire two hours and rarely lets you rest.

    Tom Hardy takes over for Mel Gibson in the title role and this hand-me-down fits perfectly: Hardy embodies Max with a vigor and animosity that both pays tribute to his predecessor and breathes entirely new life into the full-blooded character. His performance is…

  • Rashomon

    Rashomon

    ★★★★½

    Akira Kurosawa established a unique cinematic voice with his many films and is probably the most famous of 20th century Japanese directors. "Rashomon" is one of his most well-known films and with it, the director laid new foundations in the nature of cinematic narrative.

    Based on a novel, the film tells the story of a murdered man. But, Kurosawa doesn't resort to a straight retelling of one man's killing. Instead he offers a totally original concept in which the murder…