• Armageddon

    Armageddon

    ★★½

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #79.

    As dated and gloriously stupid as an Aerosmith best-of cassette tape.

  • Titanic

    Titanic

    ★★★★½

    This was the very first movie to come to mind in my catch-up project. How have I not seen it? I clearly remember trying to see it with friends at the Cornwall Center in Regina, only to find it completely sold out. I don’t know how I managed to never catch up with it until now, but it might be for the best. As a young earnestly anti-mainstream Gen-Xer, I tended to turn my nose up at clearly commercial films…

  • La Haine

    La Haine

    ★★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #77.

    Heard about the guy who fell off a skyscraper? On his way down past each floor, he kept saying to reassure himself: So far so good... so far so good... so far so good. How you fall doesn't matter. It's how you land.

    I kind of want to get rid of this tic I've picked up of using movies from the 90s to make sour comments about everything going on now, but man: 2020…

  • Independence Day

    Independence Day

    ★½

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #76.

    So, turns out the military-worshipping, anti-intellectual, conspiracy-minded target audience for this movie, has not, ultimately, been entirely a force for good in the world in the time since its release.

  • Satantango

    Satantango

    ★★★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #75.

    Listen: I’m not saying you need to watch this in long, late-night pieces over the course of a week-long bout of insomnia and unpleasant dreams. Or that the ideal milieu is in the midst of a global pandemic, while forest fires blanket everything familiar in grey-orange haze, the damage from both fueled by an ascendant coalition of the stupid and the depraved

    But if you can arrange to see it that way:😘👌.

  • The Age of Innocence

    The Age of Innocence

    ★★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #74.

    It’s never really struck me that there’s anything wrong with the middle-aged not having the passion of youth. The struggle has been in coming to think of my 45-year-old self as middle aged. But as per DDL in this movie, once you get to a certain age you just don’t need that kind of drama.

  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

    Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

    ★★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #73.

    Despairing, but makes possible Lynch’s improbable masterpiece, Twin Peaks: The Return which, while deeply sad, is not despairing.

  • A Brighter Summer Day

    A Brighter Summer Day

    ★★★★½

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #72.

    Only four hours long, but I lived a life watching this. Several, maybe.

  • Misery

    Misery

    ★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #71.

    I’ve always had a lot of affection for Stephen King’s prose, but his stories and characters and conceits are fake-fun on the page and just fake-fake on the screen. That’s why my favourite adaptations are the least literal ones, and others just leave me wondering why exactly the pig is called Misery.

  • Say Anything...

    Say Anything...

    ★★★½

    I am three years younger than John Mahoney was when he made this movie. And twenty-three years older than John Cusack was.

    That can’t possibly be right, can it?


    Anyway, this brings my catch-up project to the end of the 80s, and this is the first film that I can relate directly to my own life. I never knew anyone remotely like Lloyd Dobler or the Court family, but I experienced those cars and hairstyles and t-shirts. This is a…

  • The Last Temptation of Christ

    The Last Temptation of Christ

    ★★★★½

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #69.

    I was ostensibly raised Catholic. I was baptized and confirmed, went to mass and attended Catholic schools, talked to priests, considered myself a real rebel for rejecting the Church and an adult for appreciating the best parts of it. But despite/because of all that, it never really “took”: I’m not a person of faith and doubt I ever will be.

    What my Catholic childhood did leave with me is a fascination with the more…

  • Hellraiser

    Hellraiser

    ★★★★

    A Hundred Years of Catch-up #68.

    So gloriously adolescent in its conflation of sex and death and recondite puzzle box monsters.