• Pandora's Box

    Pandora's Box

    ★★★★

    straight girl crushes are really just the worst

  • The Crow

    The Crow

    ★★★½

    love how the protagonist is a leather-clad, harlequin-painted rock singer brought back from the dead by a supernatural crow to exact revenge on his and his fiancée's murderers, but the villain STILL manages to be more extra

  • Welcome to the Hartmanns

    Welcome to the Hartmanns

    ★½

    It's an aggravatingly didactic film, very ^°*staatstragend*°^ at that, primarily concerned with registering every official discourse and party line that were perpetuated during the 2015 European refugee crisis. More interesting, as it often is in such cases, are the perspectives that this film elides, the things it does not overtly say. An early scene at the refugee accomodation facility springs to mind: one of the men in the dormitory expresses discontent with the overall situation, with the effort and submission…

  • The Last Airbender

    The Last Airbender

    ½

    This film's failure as an individual work is inextricable from its failure as an adaptation. The Avatar series, for all its notable complexity, had still relied on season-spanning arcs constructed with elegance and ease, and many one-off episodes and subplots could be cut without doing much violence to the overarching story. It was all but un-adaptable. It had many moments of connection, consequence, and emotional resonance offered on a silver platter. In this way, "The Last Airbender" cannot even really…

  • The Cloud in Her Room

    The Cloud in Her Room

    ★★★½

    so in the introduction at Filmfest Hamburg it was said that the film incorporates various stylistic elements from the Nouvelle Vague and I got curious and really attentive and then it turned out that everyone just smokes so fucking much

  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    I'm Thinking of Ending Things

    ★★½

    ostentatious, mean-spirited and very pretty

  • Corpus Christi

    Corpus Christi

    ★★★★

    The writing is deliciously sharp on a scene-by-scene basis, with each leading to moments of revelation, intrigue and subtle irony. As a whole, the film still manages to maintain a sense of openness, uncertainty, threads left hanging. No miracle cures, no easy answers. Glad to see the camera was as in love with *that face* as I was.

  • Undine

    Undine

    ★★★★

    there's a scene in this where Franz Rogowski wraps himself in a blanket like a giant burrito and waddles up to his girlfriend to hug her while she recites her urban history lecture and that scene might just have invented romance

  • Singin' in the Rain

    Singin' in the Rain

    ★★★½

    Flexing: The Movie

  • Ninotchka

    Ninotchka

    ★★★

    Can absolutely be read as callous, broad-strokes propaganda, subsuming the pre-catastrophic tension of 1939 into high-end Old Hollywood cuteness. The intro line - "when a siren was a brunette and not an alarm, and if a frenchman turned out the light it was not on account of an air raid" - is a bit too much on the nose and self-aware for this film to be mere escapism. Ernst Lubitsch and Billy Wilder, two Jewish German expatriates who went on…

  • The Lobster

    The Lobster

    ★★★

    I admire Yorgos Lanthimos for the dedication with which he pursues his artistic vision and the absolute consistency of each scene with that vision, there is indeed something 'great' about his filmmaking, but boy do I just not vibe with it. "The Lobster" once again displays a highly recognizable and idiosyncratic sense of aesthetic strategy that would be easy to parody if it weren't already so consciously and preemptively ~weird~. While "Dogtooth" gave off an air of detached sadistic fascination,…

  • Fucking Berlin

    Fucking Berlin

    Imagine the worst kind of slam poem but instead of like five it lasts for 94 minutes