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  • Wilson

    Wilson

    ★★★½

    A wistful and sometimes chucklesome tale of the spectrum-bothering, flawed, titular character. 

    Not for all but those who can empathise with the experiences of loss, longing, and caustic love will find reassurances here. 

    For the cynically hopeful.

  • Knight of Cups

    Knight of Cups

    ★★★★½

    "I wake up... And I've forgotten about it for a few minutes... And then I remember"

    Terrence Malick makes films that are dense with hints, clues, allusions... They are philosophical investigations - He poses questions for us to consider, mull over, really chew upon. It is not for us to be fed but to hungrily process. 

    And here there is plenty to process: helicopters and earthquakes seem to be messengers sent from a folklorish father to his adrift son... Are…

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  • Why Don't You Play in Hell?

    Why Don't You Play in Hell?

    ★★★★½

    CAMERAS!
    ROLLERSKATES!
    YAKUZAS!
    JAPANESE BRUCE LEE!
    TOOTHPASTE!
    GUNS!
    DISMEMBERMENT!
    SWORDS!
    GORE! GORE! GORE!

    My god, that film was tremendously insane.

    Channelling Tarantino, Carax, Kurosawa, Takashi Miike & Gondry all at once in a dazzling rainbow of blood, guts and flying limbs.

    You'll laugh so hard that you wince and you'll wince so hard that you laugh.

    The hilarious camera-mugging by all on screen meant that the film operated at such a frenzied level it makes hysterical wailing banshees seem subtle.

    The most fun you can have in a cinema with your trousers on.

  • Under the Skin

    Under the Skin

    ★★★★½

    An oneiric float through grey concrete, green woodland and lonely lives.

    Without the artifice of constructed reality, Under The Skin captures an uncanny mood akin to a mist-strewn stroll through a seemingly recognisable world. All that is around appears familiar yet eerily different and it is this juddering tone that sets the viewer on edge whilst simultaneously rendering them unable to tear eyes from screen.

    This film will, inevitably, be divisive but those willing to invest time and thought into Glazer's construct will find bounty there, both enlightening and troubling.