Daniel PG Simpson

Daniel PG Simpson

Patron

Known on Youtube as Eyebrow Cinema. I like movies and Heavy Metal.

Favorite films

  • The Godfather: Part II
  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
  • Citizen Kane
  • Seven Samurai

Recent activity

All
  • Pandora's Box

    ★★★★½

  • The House of the Devil

    ★★★½

  • Yoga Hosers

    ½

  • Out of the Fog

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Pandora's Box

    Pandora's Box

    ★★★★½

    The most singularly arresting aspect of Pandora's Box is most certainly Louise Brooks, who is a force of personality, a flapper who explores hedonistic pleasures with delightful innocence and palpable enjoyment. Her freewheeling sense of fun and lust for life immediately pulled me into Pandora's Box, G.W. Pabst's melodrama of a fallen woman whose pleasure-seeking comes crashing down and brings ruin to everyone she touches. That's how Pandora's Box is often described, anyways, but I'm not sure that's totally fair.…

  • The House of the Devil

    The House of the Devil

    ★★★½

    The House of the Devil was not Ti West's first movie, but it was the one that most firmly established him as a major force in horror filmmaking, something he seems to really be delivering on as of late with his X trilogy. The film is an 80s throwback in both style and substance, but not in the sort of pandering and obvious way we've become accustom to in recent years. 16mm film and frequent zooms are used but less…

Popular reviews

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  • Spider-Man: No Way Home

    Spider-Man: No Way Home

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Coming to Spider-Man: No Way Home for the first time in early February is quite the experience. I did my best to avoid spoilers, but after about a week people generally stopped caring about trying to be coy. By the time I found my way in a theater, I knew Andrew and Tobey would play a major role, knew Aunt May was gonna be killed by Green Goblin, and even knew the movie was gonna end with MJ and Ned…

  • Don't Look Up

    Don't Look Up

    There's a lot I could lambast Don't Look Up for. Its central climate change metaphor doesn't actually work given the threat of climate change is a gradual breakdown of systems and not the instantaneous cataclysm the film depicts. Adam McKay's recent tendency to talk down to his audience like they're a bunch of dumb-dumbs is more condescending and self-satisfied than ever. That McKay's anger, while valid, is ultimately misplaced, targeting the masses for being too concerned with celebrity gossip and…