The Plastic House

The Plastic House

Slow, ethereal, melancholic and pensive, and the images are lovely. Initially I was startled by the date parentheses at the beginning followed by the words "Mum and Dad", but then I read about it online and realized this must have been a way for Chhorn to brazenly confront her fear of her parents' mortality. I experience the same fear myself. My father passed away to cancer 4 years ago and I sensed a part of myself slip away, while at the same time I gained something I didn't have before, if that makes sense. I think a lot about the way life will change once my mother dies too, how the passing of all forebears contributes significantly to one's sense of individuality. The metaphor of the roof falling in, the 'plasticity' of the 'house' and the cultivating of new vegetation was a really nice way to explore this. The farm and the location in general I found a very appealing space to be among for the duration. I guess it's unsurprising that this could be referred to as 'demanding', but I didn't find it difficult to watch at all. It's very much about the viewer. Many people, both in and out of film circles, may find this sort of thing inaccessible because it's not a language they're used to or comfortable with. I think it's an effective example of film as therapy, Chhorn using the production process to defang her personal demons, and a fine demonstration of what can be crafted out of frailty, singlehandedly, with patience and care.

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