Army of the Dead

Army of the Dead

A far cry from the best Snyder has to offer, but it also has more zeal than most anything else I’m finding from studios nowadays, but I’m sure that’s a debate that’s been tuckered out. Most fascinating is that this is a film without remorse for its inconsequence. The capital of Americana is nuked and our remaining cast never even gets a chance to reconvene with what remains of their reality. Surely this infers franchising, but it’s rather surprising to finish a film and it have no shame in giving no shits to how or what we have to extrapolate. The allegories are loud and clear, but it so quickly abandons that for an exploitation of genre signifiers. And all the same contortions are here that were present in his Dawn remake, but there’s little care for humanity here — everyone is the inevitable victim of a country that’s excess and violence stems directly out of its ability to persist functioning. And perhaps it’s the abandon on display that shakes these notions from a tall tree. 

What more is Snyder’s cinematography, which surely is not the highlight of his career, but how intent he is on isolating the pact, cutting to and fro between single MCUs, it’s jarring but a contextually curious rebuke of Netflix’s house style of broad, textureless 101 linguistics (but maybe that’s just a safe directorial guard in hiring, for the most part, non-image makers). The shallow depth of field is utilized really beautifully a few times, some gorgeously choreographed racks accentuating scale through some smart lensing. 

The film’s defining moment is surely the needlessly violent death that throws us into the third act. It’s exceedingly confrontational leering with a little pop of a bone to top off the beat and a tear rolling down the cheek. A shocking tear down of sentimentality in this film’s world, much in the same manner the final act ends prior to our epilogue. Constantly we just observe as Snyder’s more signature sentimentalism is ripped away and what’s left is not much of anything. The film ends on a punchline that surely imagines the perpetuation of human degradation, and all in the face of a nuke being unceremoniously dropped on capital’s capital... and who cares if I’m “reading too much into it,” as so many close to me likes to say, it’s just a movie.