Favorite films

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  • Don't Worry Darling

  • The Good House

    ★★★★

  • The Greatest Beer Run Ever

    ★★★

  • Blonde

    ★½

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  • Don't Worry Darling

    Don't Worry Darling

    Even the soft reviews didn’t prepare me for what a car wreck Don’t Worry Darling is. So sweatily montage-y and needle drop-y from the jump that it doesn’t even seem to want to create an Ira Levin-style eerie normality to disrupt. No one in the cast other than Pugh connects at all. And Styles is a disaster who earns every bad laugh. I was amused by the pilfering of imagery from very recent movies (Us, Hereditary, Parasite, Suspiria) but at least it steals from the best. (Landmark Kendall Square)

  • The Good House

    The Good House

    ★★★★

    The Good House is one of the most interesting movies about alcoholism I’ve seen, in part because of its lack of histrionics. Sigourney creates such an utterly convincing character—one who’s such a pleasure to be around—that she even sells the script’s risky direct-address gambit. (Regal Fenway)

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  • Blonde

    Blonde

    ★½

    If you’re a Marilyn fan (or even if not), Blonde is a miserable experience, a stylistically pompous victim narrative in which she has barely a moment to display agency, talent, curiosity, or joy. The movie’s staunch refusal to dig deeper than “Daddy issues, amirite?” is alarming. (Landmark Kendall Square)

  • Benediction

    Benediction

    ★★★★½

    A movie like Benediction makes you realize that, for all the biopics of artists we get, they rarely figure out a way to integrate the subject’s work in a way that deepens the narrative.

    But Terence Davies, historian as much as filmmaker, has woven a poetry movie, a WWI movie, and movie about a certain class of gay life between the world wars into a cohesive, moving statement.

    Jack Lowden is major here (that stunning final scene), but I loved…