Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice ★★★★½

I wanted to write about this terrifyingly polarizing film for a while because it remains for me the most ambitious superhero film that has ever been attempted, with two of the most timeless superheroes of the 20th century: Batman and Superman.

Now, I assure you that I 1000% understand any and all hate for this film. I've watched the extended edition at least five times, and on the last three I didn't at all force myself to turn it off before the atrocious final act. That being said, my romance for Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice is a profound one, derivative of the sheer philosophical magnanimity with which [most of] the first hour and forty minutes are executed. 
It was that first post-credit scene that sealed the deal for me:

METROPOLIS
MANKIND IS INTRODUCED TO THE SUPERMAN

Not "Superman". The Superman.
It's that one additional word that singlehandedly establishes the ubiquity with which Snyder seeks to replicate an entirely unique approach to the superhero genre. This isn't a film about a guy in a cape, stopping crime and getting the girl.
This is an observation of an unfathomable paradigm shift, and the chaotic onslaught of madness incited as a result.
The romanticism of the MCU is cast aside here. There are no cozy Stan Lee cameos. No; here's an examination of an honest world of men and women, in which the true frailty and spacial insignificance of the human experience becomes personified by the letter 'S'; a white man blazing through the sky; a man whose sheer presence unravels the entirety of human existentialism, challenging every method, tool, and description with which our species has placed itself within the story of the universe. The cage is rattled, and men learn of the cage.

This film wants you terrified. Drawing upon the madness that was Man of Steel, we enter a world where a disagreement between two unstoppable men can level a metropolis. A world in which warring superpowers that once touted weapons of mass destruction are forcibly faced with a class of individuals who, in and of themselves, are superpowers. 

The news reel segment is one of the greatest cinematic experiences I have yet to have. In it, we come aware of a new emphasis, as well as a frantic desperation, newly placed upon/made synonymous with man's place in the world. The film emphasizes its point; it seeks to question the assumed stabilizers of men's civilization from the angle of a culture's mass-power fantasy--the comic book genre--and then seeks to turn that power fantasy against its partitioners. I believe that it succeeds.

What policy stands between our species' mortality and a paradigm shift?
Where do you run when one man's will can destroy a planet?
Just how much control do you have over your own mortality?

Batman vs. Superman: Dawn Of Justice presses these questions in a manner that I have never seen before. The match-up stands; Superman, the physical embodiment  of man's newly actualized vulnerability, and Batman, the embodiment of a species' sheer reluctance to both acknowledge and accept this new truth.

The end result? 
...
A shitshow. 
The film loses these ideas for the sake of generic spectacle. The creation of Doomsday pains me. The final fights are cringeworthy. The Martha debacle does not logically reduce "The Superman" to a mother's child.

But god damn, if this film is not one of the most intellectually stimulating pieces of capeshit that has ever been produced. Please, indulge, engage, digest, and study. We deserve more like this. Challenging stories. Challenging character studies. Challenging sociological studies. 
Superheroes can be smart, too. They just need the right touch and a strong follow-through.

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