Robert Stinner

Freelance writer (LitHub, Bright Wall/Dark Room, CrimeReads, Animus, Crooked Marquee, MAYDAY Magazine)
he/him/his

Favorite films

  • The Wizard of Oz
  • The Night of the Hunter
  • Cabaret
  • Sunset Boulevard

Recent activity

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  • Midnight

    ★★★★★

  • L'immensità

    ★★★

  • Mutt

    ★★★★

  • Shortcomings

    ★★★½

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  • The Hours

    The Hours

    ★★★★

    I wrote about The Hours for Bright Wall/Dark Room, a film I loved as a teenager but have a more complicated relationship with now:

    “When I was 14, I regularly sifted through Netflix’s “Gay/Lesbian” section for illuminating queer cinema. Predictably, this wasn’t usually a successful endeavor, but I was able to find a few films that helped shape my taste and my understanding of queerness—I Killed My Mother, Far From Heaven, Andrew Haigh’s Weekend. The film with the most pressing,…

  • Swoon

    Swoon

    ★★★★½

    I wrote about portrayals of queer criminality in Tom Kalin’s Swoon and Gregg Araki’s The Living End, and why I think contemporary queer cinema could use more films like these, for CrimeReads. Give it a read! 

    “Despite its period setting, Kalin created in Swoon a sharp perspective on how marginalized people are blamed for crime and social dysfunction, with a particularly pointed view on how queer sex is treated as a sinister act on par with murder.”

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  • The Muppet Christmas Carol

    The Muppet Christmas Carol

    ★★★★★

    I’d like an invite to the penguins’ Christmas skating party

  • The House of Mirth

    The House of Mirth

    ★★★★½

    I wrote on this film as a model Edith Wharton adaptation for LitHub:

    “This combination of deep attention to the content of Wharton’s novel and commitment to the unique possibilities of film is a rare alchemy, yet it’s vitally important for literary adaptations. While some creators mine works of literature for parts and dilute the source material (or, alternatively, adapt literary work without a cinematic point of view), Davies uses his own distinct aesthetics to illuminate and expand upon Wharton’s work.”