Carol ★★★★★

the dreamy TUNNEL scene ??? we see blurry glimpses of their hands, eyes, clothes you can't hear or see what's going on you cannot understand even if you tried (in a good way) ... i really fucking appreciate the way todd haynes created this whole transcendent feeling? it goes starkly in contrast with a society that is repressive and attempts to label them as other, fit them into a box they can understand - morality clause, pattern of behaviour, etc + it adhered to the whole flung in space thing going on there and gay love in the 1950s was exactly that ... in space, off tangent and undechiperable to the cishets but like. in this movie this quality was used for GOOD it was used to show how beautiful and tender this love is

the way women turn to each other for support like carol turning to abby for advice, abby confessing in carol about her crush on a woman, how carol nurtured therese's love in photography rather than dismiss it like richard

and the way carol was presented as the one who's seemingly confident in her sexuality, and has the upper hand (partly due to her social class) and therese, an Insecure Gay, banked on that but realises carol is just as vulnerable to society's bullshit as she is despite her social class her point of reference is STILL a man regardless, her life is not stable because of her sexuality, she's ostracised which makes the scene where therese breaks down so relatable. in a society which condemns homosexuality you desperately want to see someone thriving and like. when that shit gets taken from you its so sad i felt that Gay Loneliness

cate blanchett rly nailed this whole balance i love her for this beyond the fact that shes smoking hot and i want her to rail me

also the line. "what happened with therese, i wanted. and i will not deny it." fucking gold in a context where love is reduced to furtive glances, touches on shoulders, disguised as the action of returning gloves ... my favourite line in the entire film maybe + you could see her shaking while saying it I FELT THAT

PINNACLE OF MODERN CINEMA WHICH DESERVED BEST PICTURE