• Sally Jane Black

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    So much has been written about the perspective this has on race that I hardly think I could add to it. Instead I will simply note the parts that I especially liked (and the one thing I hated):

    The moment Chris is told that what the man who bought him at slave auction wants from him is his eyes drives home the intention to capture as many facets of the way capitalism and racism treats black people as commodities. The…

  • Ellen Andrews

    β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…Β½

    A modern classic, and a definitive film of our time. It's terrifying, because it's true.

    I just have an issue with a tonal shift once the Bad Stuff starts happening. It takes us away from the action for too long & doesn't serve any real purpose (the police station scene). There's a totally pointless jump-scare musical sting at one point too.
    This is ultimately nitpicking though, and I'm sure I'll come back to it many times in the future.

  • Frankco Lamerikx

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    It's good to see that we live in an era where it is still (or once again) possible to make original horror films that stay away from the endless cycle of remakes and movies aimed solely at a teenage audience. Get Out, along with other recent entries in the genre such as It Follows (2014) and Raw (2016), is very well made, it's tense, and it actually has something to say. Here's to hoping this trend will continue for a while...!

  • Tom Morton

    β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…Β½

    There seems to have been a pattern the last few years (and quite possibly beyond, before I started paying attention) where one horror film is selected as THE horror film that everyone has to talk about that year. While I enjoyed The Babadook, It Follows and (to some extent) The Witch, I didn't think any of them were really the best the genre had to offer in their respective years and the hype probably had more of a negative effect…

  • Ethan C. F. πŸ‡

    β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…Β½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Horror more in the vein of Rosemary's Baby, The House of the Devil, and The Wicker Man, Get Out is a masterclass in paranoid tension. It's the classic horror structure of one person unraveling a mystery while everyone around them is either unbelieving of their paranoia, or secretly in on it. This formula is tricky to pull off: if you don't carefully construct atmosphere, or empathize the audience with your protagonist, it feels slow. Thankfully, Peele's comedic knack livens up…

  • Aaron T. Rex

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    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Probably the best cinema going experience I have had so far this year. Loved pretty much everything about it. The acting is fantastic, hits all the moments it needs to. I was completely sucked into everything that was going on, creeped out, laughing, feeling sad. It's what going to the movies is for me, this movie nailed it. It builds up perfectly with all the weird "what's going on" moments, people looking and acting strange, I love all that. That's…

  • Max Oxley

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    I pray there are some fellow Skins fans on this webular site who can relate to my astonishment that the actor who got his start playing Posh Kenneth, an extraordinarily one-note character who existed purely as a running joke that a person could be BLACK and UPPER CLASS (!!!!!!), is now starring in one of the most socially relevant studies of race politics in recent years.

    Anyway, I loved this. You don't need me to tell you it's great. I…

  • Henry

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    A fun premise as Daniel Kaluuya heads to meet his girlfriend's parents. Four months in, it would be daunting for anyone. But he's black, she's white and well, apparently they live in a nice house in the country. Here's hoping they don't mind their daughter shacking up with a man with a different skin colour...

    Man, this is a fun film. A lot of fun. Should you believe the hype? Yes. Is it good as a lot of people are…

  • Danny Webster

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    Get Out is driven by its seminal anxiety and the seeming acceptance of subtle racism in light of an unchallenged ethical drift - albeit, not particularly a drift, or a change, but an attribute that evolves and characterises normal white people behaviour towards black people.

    The film depicts a situation in which, our main character is tied down and forced to accept the racist remarks, the shifting deportment of each family member of his girlfriend - the rigid placement in…