Favorite films

  • Oslo, August 31st
  • Certain Women
  • Mouthpiece
  • Leave No Trace

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  • The Loneliest Whale: The Search for 52

    ★★★

  • The Hidden Life of Trees

    ★★★

  • The Here After

    ★★★★

  • Sweat

    ★★★★

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  • The Loneliest Whale: The Search for 52

    The Loneliest Whale: The Search for 52

    ★★★

    REVIEW by Alex Heeney

    It’s fortuitous that not one but two documentaries about whale songs and communication have come to VOD this summer: The Loneliest Whale: In Search of 52 and Fathom. Though The Loneliest Whale is the lesser of the two, it’s still a fascinating look inside bioacoustics research, and an investigation of a puzzle that’s fascinated people for years. Back in 2004, The New York Times published an article about the storied 52 Hz whale: a single whale…

  • The Hidden Life of Trees

    The Hidden Life of Trees

    ★★★

    REVIEW by Alex Heeney

    Based on Peter Wohlleben’s best-selling book, Jörg Adolph’s documentary follows Wohlleben around the world to visit threatened forests in British Columbia, the oldest tree in the world in Sweden, forests of varying degrees of health across Europe, and much more. Through sitting in on Wohlleben’s public lectures or capturing his personal video diaries, Adolph introduces us to the renowned forester, who, in turn, introduces us to his great love of trees...

    Read the full review here.

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  • Quo vadis, Aida?

    Quo vadis, Aida?

    ★★★★★

    AN INTERVIEW WITH ACTRESS JASNA DJURICIC by Alex Heeney

    In our introduction to Aida (Jasna Đuričić), she is sat at a meeting table between several Dutch UN officials and the mayor of Srebrenica. The group sits in silence, and Quo Vadis, Aida? director Jasmila Žbanić cuts to each of them individually, as they glance around the table with a mix of hesitancy and hopelessness, willing someone else to gather the nerve to speak. Aida’s expression is different. She also looks…

  • Miguel's War

    Miguel's War

    ★★★★

    AN INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR ELIANE RAHEB by Orla Smith

    I realised that Miguel’s War was going to be a boundary-pushing documentary as soon as the film’s subject, Miguel Alonso, responded to a probing question from director Eliane Raheb by laughing and exclaiming, “What a horrible bitch!” Raheb tells the story of Miguel, from his childhood in Lebanon, to his participation in the Lebanese Civil War, to his life in Spain, where he lives today, as an out gay man. But…