• Short Cuts

    Short Cuts

    ★★★★½

    One of the hippest directors of the counterculture era, Altman is a Hollywood filmmaker who focused on the messier parts of life that other pictures had always left out. Altman finds the pompous attitude of Los Angeles residents to be an appalling embarrassment and views them all as shameful creatures, desperate comfort-seekers who actively sabotage their own futures and happiness. But he doesn't hate humanity; he has no delusions of grandeur, and expresses not anger, but further shame. He knows…

  • Once

    Once

    ★★★★

    Once, I was in the town square
    when a girl asked me for directions.
    I played her a song
    she sang right along
    and asked if I wanted to go for a beer.

    Once, I went for a beer with a girl
    We played music and treasured the moment.
    Our harmonies blended
    And so I suggested
    Perhaps we could take on the world.

    Once, I took on the world with this lady.
    She invited me into her home.
    I discovered…

  • Punch-Drunk Love

    Punch-Drunk Love

    ★★★★★

    Barry Egan is a character with a lot of quirks, very specific mannerisms and hyper-fixations comprising his personality. We only ever see him in a suit and tie, but it is made clear that this too is an eccentricity, that he usually dresses more casually. This might be obvious, but it just occured to me that this particular detail is a reference to Adam Sandler in this more "dressed up" role than the rest of his less sophisticated filmography.

  • Licorice Pizza

    Licorice Pizza

    ★★★★★

    in 70mm

    He's licorice, she's pizza. They're both spunky loveable junk food that belong at the same juvenile parties, but they're not a combination one expects to find on any self-respecting menu. Paul Thomas Anderson, following up his daring romantic drama Phantom Thread, is once again completely unbothered by such social constructs. The director's 3rd trip to 70s LA is breezy and hilarious, moving with the chaotic energy of Inherent Vice and the flamboyant dream logic of Punch Drunk Love,…

  • C'mon C'mon

    C'mon C'mon

    ★★★★

    Made me want to delete Letterboxd, in the best way possible. Interact only with real people and have real-world experiences and real conversations in a space where words have actual consequences—both positive and otherwise—because social media is such a pale simulation of human connection that it can only be a waste of time, a distraction. I've gotten into massive arguments online with less ramifications than a simple glance between these 2 characters. I'm gonna go take my nieces on a walk.

  • The Untouchables

    The Untouchables

    ★★★★

    Costner's Elliot Ness is a levelheaded man of justice, and Deniro's Al Capone is a bad, violent man, even if you take the arbitrarity of his anti-prohibition criminality into account, but The Untouchables is far from a "good" vs "bad" movie – it's America vs Anti-America. Like his contemporaries Coppola and Scorsese, de Palma's film feels deeply rooted in American soil, as though this is a land's-eye-view historical judgement of the antiquated belief that America could only survive if patriotism…

  • Fargo

    Fargo

    ★★★★★

    Fargo is a movie about real life. Real life isn't made up of neat narrative arcs and clean happy endings. It's messy, random, and things happen for no reason. You probably won't have a hero's journey, and if you do it probably won't take place in three acts. This is clearly the same amusingly senseless Coens who would next make The Big Lebowski, full of entertaining characters, clever dialogue, and a plot that gets increasingly convoluted only to end up…

  • Licorice Pizza

    Licorice Pizza

    ★★★★★

    in 70mm

    revels in elated euphoria, but always grounded in the anxiety of rejection and potential loneliness. by far PTA's funniest, and with his most socially well-adjusted characters. can be seen as a spiritual prequel to several of his films. absurdly pure.

  • Nitram

    Nitram

    ★★★½

    There is an uncontrollable mania suppressed tightly just beneath the surface, underlying every moment, frantically gnawing at the restraints that keep it under control, actively threatening to violently disrupt the precarious equilibrium. There is a relentless urgency implicit beneath moments of apparent tranquility as Caleb Landry Jones disappears into his role, becoming an unnerving, deeply uncomfortable presence. It is a bleak experience of moral disorientation and ethical turmoil, on top of such overt horrors as the human capability for evil...…

  • Encanto

    Encanto

    ★★★½

    Although the Madrigal family is not technically royalty, Encanto is still unmistakably a princess movie, covering the usual themes of destiny and self-actualization. However, Encanto continues in Moana's more progressive path, centering around a more fully realized and individual female protagonist. The movie is completely about Mirabel and her family, with no romantic "prince charming" subplot to distract from her own personal journey. She both metaphorically and quite literally grows from a powerless little girl into an empowered young woman, conquering her demons all on her own.

    Full review on Loud and Clear!

  • Short Cuts

    Short Cuts

    ★★★★½

    Robert Altman is a cinematic scientist, but Short Cuts feels less like an experiment and more like a master craftsman at the peak of his ability, applying the amassed experience of a storied career and the results of decades of prior experimentation into a proudly humble cinematic epic. Calling it an epic feels misplaced, as it is a film grounded in characters and revolving around their interweaving narratives, but at over 3 hours long and with 22 main characters, any…

  • House of Gucci

    House of Gucci

    ★½

    "Never confuse shit with chocolate. They may look the same, but they taste very different" -me explaining the difference between an actual prestige film and desperate overblown Oscar bait