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  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

    ★★★★½

    This is absolutely the most visually amazing animated film I've seen since Wall-E, and as far as live-action stuff goes, it's probably on the same level of even something like 2001: A Space Odyssey when it comes to sheer, unparalleled visual splendor, which, along with the excellent writing, clever, 4th wall-breaking sense of humor, and overall level of emotion, combine to make everyone who would refuse to see this just because it's a PG-rated animated movie look like a complete and utter fool. Everyone, see this, NOW.

  • Mean Streets

    Mean Streets

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    My entry for 1973 in my series on the defining Hollywood films of the New Hollywood movement:

    Personal Thoughts:

    It had been a long time since I'd first seen Mean Streets, but it held up very well upon rewatch here, so much so that I have to say it's actually the best film I've written about for this project since Bonnie And Clyde, way back when. Now, don't get me wrong, I don't think this is Scorsese's best movie or…

  • Hereditary

    Hereditary

    ★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    I finally just watched this, and I definitely didn't like it on the whole. Don't get me wrong, I didn't think it was BAD or anything, just disappointing in comparison to my expectations. There were good aspects, of course; the intense performances, creepy cinematography, and lovingly detailed production design were all quite good on their own, it's just in the overall tone and execution that the film struggles, as we go from a slightly problematic but still relatively promising first…

  • The Godfather

    The Godfather

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    My entry for 1972 in my series on the defining Hollywood films of the New Hollywood movement:

    PERSONAL THOUGHTS:

    Let's get this out of the way right here and now; I do not care for The Godfather... at least, that is, not as much as I'm "supposed" to. And it's obviously not the first time in this thread that some sort of disappointment has happened with me and a New Hollywood classic, and it probably won't be the last, so…

  • A Clockwork Orange

    A Clockwork Orange

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    My entry for 1971 for my series on the defining films of the New Hollywood Movement:

    Personal Thoughts:

    It had been over a decade since I last watched A Clockwork Orange, but rewatching it for this project, I found that my feelings on it are more or less the same as they were the first few times I watched it; it's certainly a very unique movie, and one that I have a lot respect for, but not really one I…

  • The Matrix

    The Matrix

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    The world at the end of the 20th century was united in celebration, marvelling at such phenomena as the birth of the modern Internet, connecting mankind further than ever before in the history of the world, which served as a contrast to the tremendous, simultaneous anxiety many people felt at as the new millennium, and the spector of Y2K and an accidental revolt by the same machines that connected us, approached, creating a singular moment in time that was ripe…

  • M*A*S*H

    M*A*S*H

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    My entry for 1970 for my series on the defining films of the New Hollywood Movement:

    Personal Thoughts:

    Yes, Robert Altman's M*A*S*H is the first film I've discussed for this project without having already seen it before, and not only that, but it's also the first Robert Altman film I've ever seen, period. And, while I'm a bit embarrassed to admit all of that, and a bit nervous to talk about a movie I've just now viewed for the first…

  • Night of the Living Dead

    Night of the Living Dead

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    My entry for 1968 for my series on the defining films of the New Hollywood Movement:

    PERSONAL THOUGHTS:

    It had been a long time since I first watched Night Of The Living Dead, and rewatching it over a decade later, certain aspects of it don't hold up as well as I remembered, such as certain, poorly-paced dry stretches where the characters don't do much besides listen to officials on the radio or TV deliver vague exposition that rambles on for…

  • Easy Rider

    Easy Rider

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Here's my entry for 1969 for my series on the films of the New Hollywood Movement:

    PERSONAL THOUGHTS:

    It had been a long time since I last watched Easy Rider, but rewatching it now for this project, my feelings on it are more or less the same as they were the first couple times I saw it; it's definitely too scattered and aimless in its overall narrative, and often too pointlessly "experimental" in its style to be a great film,…

  • Bonnie and Clyde

    Bonnie and Clyde

    ★★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    I felt like doing something different lately besides just regular, straight-up reviews, which is this series detailing the history of the "New Hollywood" movement, the wave of American films that broke loose from the constrictions of the Classical Hollywood era, and severely pushed the limits on both style and content, and discuss both my personal feelings and my analysis on how the films in question influenced both the movement and cinema both at home and abroad as a whole, doing…

  • You Were Never Really Here

    You Were Never Really Here

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    I admit it, I didn't quite like You Were Never Really Here as much as I hoped to; it's hard for me to put my finger on just exactly why (maybe the meaning of some of its hallucinatory imagery was just a bit too obvious to satisfy), but whatever the reason, I wasn't as immersed by its fractured style as I should've been, which led to some of the more familiar potboiler-y elements of its story/characters feeling slightly staler than…

  • Mission: Impossible - Fallout

    Mission: Impossible - Fallout

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Sometimes, I think Christopher McQuarrie is a bit of his own worse enemy when it comes to his entries in this franchise, as, like Rogue Nation (but even worse in this regard), when it's not in the middle of some new, hug setpiece, Fallout wastes too much of its screentime and narrative momentum on maintaining and layering on an increasingly, needlessly convoluted series of spy thriller double-crosses and betrayals that are either rushed out before we have the chance to…