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Matt has written 211 reviews for films rated ★★★★ .

  • Pain and Glory

    Pain and Glory

    ★★★★

    An extremely white film: The white movie screen that looms large in Salvador’s memories. The white-walled cave home where he lived as a child. The white dresser he uses to pile and crush his drugs before consuming them. The white paint on an old piece of paper that becomes the canvas for a sketch that holds the key to transforming one word in the title into the other.

  • Marriage Story

    Marriage Story

    ★★★★

    lol I could not relate to this movie in any way my marriage is perfect ahahahahahahahahaehehehehehehoh god

  • The Irishman

    The Irishman

    ★★★★

    This may not be the true end of the road for Scorsese and De Niro, who’ve worked together since 1973, but either way that is what The Irishman is about: Their passage through this world and the sad fate that awaits all of us, saints and sinners alike, when we reach our final destination.

    Full review at ScreenCrush.

  • Casino

    Casino

    ★★★★

    My main takeaway from this viewing of Casino is in the title; it’s not “The Casino” or “Tangiers” or “Ace and Nicky.” It’s just Casino. Vegas, the mob, the massive grift, it’s all a microcosm for life. 

    The key sequence is early in the picture, where Ace details how a billionaire took his casino for millions and they engineer a scheme to get him back in the building by faking a broken plane. “In the casino,” De Niro says in voiceover…

  • John Wick: Chapter 2

    John Wick: Chapter 2

    ★★★★

    John Wick, a man so ascetic he didn’t even name his dog.

  • John Wick

    John Wick

    ★★★★

    Actors I forgot were in the first John Wick: Willem Dafoe, Clarke Peters, Adrianne Palicki, and Michael Nyqvist. I also forgot how dryly funny this one is at times, like when John nonchalantly bumps in to Peters’ fellow assassin and they exchange the blandest of pleasantries. They’re competitors, in a certain sense, but they’re more like colleagues who share a peculiar vocation (they are essentially traveling salesman whose product is death).

    On the one hand, this is an outrageous amount…

  • Ad Astra

    Ad Astra

    ★★★★

    Brad Pitt head out into deep space to search for his missing father in Dad Astra, coming soon to theaters everywhere.

    Full review at ScreenCrush.

  • Good Boys

    Good Boys

    ★★★★

    As long as kids watch movies at sleepovers — Do kids still watch movies at sleepovers? I have no idea — Good Boys will endure.

    Way, way better than I expected. Full review at ScreenCrush.

  • Avengers: Endgame

    Avengers: Endgame

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Rewatched with directors’ commentary, which honestly did not add a ton of insights. I did like the part where they talk about shooting with Redford and he basically “Boys, this is my last job ever as an actor.” I really hope their response was “Cool, now look at Ruffalo and pretend that instead of a dude covered with dots he’s a giant green rage monster.”

  • Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

    Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

    ★★★★

    It is possible to make a genuinely scary PG-13-rated horror movie, and here is the proof. Full review at ScreenCrush.

  • Star Trek Beyond

    Star Trek Beyond

    ★★★★

    I watched it again with Justin Lin commentary and came to a brain-melting realization: There is a foolproof way to determine if a modern Star Trek will be good.

    If Chris Pine’s hair is parted to the right, as in Star Trek and Star Trek Beyond, the movie will be good.

    If Chris Pine’s hair is parted to the left, as in Star Trek Into Darkness, the movie will be bad.

    Henceforth, this shall be known as The Pine Directive.

  • Star Trek Beyond

    Star Trek Beyond

    ★★★★

    Still love this one. It feels like the most comfortable of the Kelvin films — and at the same time the fact that the actors and creators might be feeling a little complacent is woven into the story. 

    I know I have a soft spot for very meta films that interrogate their own purpose, but this one does that really well. (It’s also super timely and allegorical, another way it carries forward the tradition of the original series.) Justin Lin…