• The Postman Always Rings Twice

    The Postman Always Rings Twice

    Calum Iain MacIver

    ★★★

    David Mamet's adaptation of James M. Cain's novel sees itinerant drifter and part time criminal Frank Chambers (Jack Nicholson) being hired as a mechanic by Greek garage / cafe owner Nick Papadakis (John Colicos) and his wife Cora (Jessica Lange). Frank and Cora quickly begin a torrid affair and soon begin to see Nick as the impediment to their happiness and their thoughts are soon turning to murder. Bob Rafelson directs with a eye to a grim and gritty depression-era…

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    Kevin Jones

    ★★★★½

    Ranked: Wes Anderson
    2018 Ranked
    Seen in Theaters

    There are few joys in filmgoing greater than getting to see a new Wes Anderson film. Isle of Dogs, of course, is no exception. This eccentric, whip smart, socially conscious, touching, and truly funny film is not just a beautiful ode to the relationship shared between humans and their beloved dogs, but also an examination of serious political issues. Masking the latter behind layers of classic Anderson quirkiness, influence from Akira Kurosawa,…

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    John Mathews

    ★★★★

    Isle of Isle of Dogs.

  • The Royal Tenenbaums

    The Royal Tenenbaums

    Simon Crowe

    ★★★★

    Rewatched for the first time in many years after seeing Isle of Dogs.  I’m struck by the degree to which it feels like a film about adults made by someone barely adult. The yearning for forgiveness, resolution, and connection among the family is very touching, as is the sense in retrospect that Anderson isn’t fully in control of his effects yet. (There’s a lot of work done with music that might be handled another way in later films.) You’ve never…

  • The Royal Tenenbaums

    The Royal Tenenbaums

    Jordan Smith

    Only one that feels a little like make-believe dress-up to me. All the pieces are in place, but I don't take to it like I do the others. Anderson's quiet repurposing of the Vince Guaraldi Trio's "Christmas Time Is Here" is a subtle example of how referential footnotes bust his movies wide open, though.

  • The Darjeeling Limited

    The Darjeeling Limited

    Jordan Smith

    In The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson threads the needle between thematic bluntness and his patented emotional deflection in a way he hasn't before or since. The metaphors come swift and simple: brothers struggling with the literal baggage of their deceased father (in personalized Louis Vuitton suitcases, no less); three Indian boys playing carelessly in a raging river alongside Anderson's bickering brothers (Owen Wilson nudges the viewer: "Look at these assholes"); a man's visage cocooned in bandages he isn't ready to take…

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    Mark

    ★★★½

    Good olé Wes.

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    Thomas Mariani

    ★★★½

    "There are incredibly intricate moments of mechanics and small subtle moments of personality that turn these hunks of plastic into living breathing beings. Nothing impresses me more than seeing these puppets tear up in real time. It’s a true feat of cinematic magic that never fails to amaze when it is showcased."

    Full Review: marianithomas.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/isle-of-dogs-2018-woofs-and-yips-abound/

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    MichaelEternity

    ★★★★½

    So Wes Anderson that it's like an infinite mirror image of itself, or something...

    You know how his movies can be simultaneously laugh-out-loud deadpan, innocently winsome, searingly heartbreaking, cautiously optimistic, bleak yet romantic yet morbid yet fanciful, extraordinarily handcrafted down to the smallest detail in the corner of the frame, beautiful art exhibits about the suppressed emotions of lost people in wounded states of arrested adolescence? This is all that, writ larger than ever. His most ambitiously staged production to…

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    feedingbrett

    ★★★½

    From the films that started with Fantastic Mr. Fox, Wes Anderson have taken on the ambitious task of fabricating worlds that depart from actual reality. As fictitious, inspired, and at times mythical as they could be, they are deeply rooted by a sense of familiarity that makes the entire world simultaneously wondrous and empathic. May that be the underground structures that are navigated in Fantastic Mr. Fox, or the middle class wilderness and paradise of Moonrise Kingdom, or the nostalgic…

  • Crimes and Misdemeanors

    Crimes and Misdemeanors

    Nicholas Imperatori

    ★★★★★

    “God is a luxury I can’t afford.”

    This is what a perfect film looks like: flawless performances (and I do mean flawless), fantastic storytelling, interesting and complex characters, and a true understanding of humanity. Woody Allen’s Crimes and Misdemeanors feels almost free-flowing in its execution, all the characters and dialogue feel as if they’ve been pulled from reality. The film is both introspective and meta-cinematic (moreso towards the end anyways). There are some very heavy issues that are dealt with…

  • Isle of Dogs

    Isle of Dogs

    Stephen Jayne

    ★★★★

    One of the more enjoyable first time Wes Anderson watches for me. Still not sure about the decision to not have subtitles, but I'm just pumped Tilda Swinton played a pug named Oracle.