• American Graffiti

    American Graffiti

    Just as the decade of the seventies was getting underway, still trying to shake off the yoke of the late sixties, two nostalgia-oriented memory pieces were released in 1971 that proved tremendously popular with movie-going audiences. Peter Bogdanovich’s The Last Picture Show, based on the novel by Hud writer Larry McMurtry, who based the novel on his youth growing up in the small Texas town of Anarene during the fifties. And Robert Mulligan’s Summer of ‘42, written as a screenplay…

  • Return of the Tiger

    Return of the Tiger

    (21st Century Distribution) Despite having the same lead actor (Bruce Li), and director (Lee Tso Nam, under his Jimmy Shaw pseudonym), and many of the same cast members, Return of the Tiger isn’t a sequel to Bruce Li’s earlier Los Angeles hit with the ebony-kung fu loving crowd, Dimension Pictures’ Exit the Dragon, Enter the Tiger. But trash flick distributor 21st Century Distribution sure wants you to think it is. Hence the sound alike name, though the story and characters…

  • Fists Of Bruce Lee

    Fists Of Bruce Lee

    (Cinema Shares Int) Fists of Bruce Lee is a lighter toned 1978 item, with Bruce (director as well) Li (eventually revealed, again, as an Interpol agent) posing as an electronic surveillance expert, who’s given access to a reclusive gangster’s estate in order to install a security system. Like Return of the Tiger, two different gangs with an army of minions, played by a large cast of familiar Hong Kong film faces, take up almost half of the running time. Including…

  • Death Force

    Death Force

    (Caprican Three) Death Force re-unites genial, beefy black third-string action star James (Angels, Hard As They Come) Iglehart and producer-director Cirio H. Santiago (they both did 1973’s Savage! and 1974’s Bamboo Gods and Iron Men together) in a unique blend of a Filipino blaxploitation/revengeamatic and a samurai slice-em-up, filmed around 1976 in the Philippines and Los Angeles.

    Three Vietnam veterans, Iglehart, Leon Isaac (Kennedy, later of Penitentiary 1,2,& 3 and the surprisingly entertaining Body and Soul remake for Cannon Pictures),…

  • Death Promise

    Death Promise

    Two late seventies films that never received a proper LA release crept into Los Angeles in 1980 as part of the Howard Mahler catalog, a South Bronx-set Kung Fu revengeamatic, and a third-rate Pam Grier rip-off, titled respectively, Death Promise and Velvet Smooth.

    Velvet Smooth could be called Burlap Brown, that by comparison at least, makes Jack Hill look like Joseph Von Sternberg. The film features as its lead Johnnie Hill, a pretty worn out looking bag of bones, who…

  • The Human Factor

    The Human Factor

    George (“Airport 75”) Kennedy plays John Kinsdale, an American computer engineer who lives abroad in Rome with his family (his wife and seven-year-old daughter), who becomes unglued when his loved ones are massacred one afternoon by a bunch of seventies Euro-styled, Baader-Meinhof inspired terrorists.

    Soon it becomes apparent that these massacres of American families living abroad in Italy are part of a calculated rein of terror. The local Italian cop on the case, Raf (“The Other Side of Midnight”) Vallone,…

  • Big Guns

    Big Guns

    A pasta-land violent crime picture where visiting French superstar Alain Delon blasts his way through an assortment of famous Euro film faces.

    Tony Arzenta (Alain Delon) – the best Hit Man in the business – works for a crime family syndicate, run by four crime bosses, all from different countries, – legendary Hollywood old fuck – Richard (“The Violent Professionals”) Conte (Italy), eagle-faced – normally a Nazi – Anton Diffring (Germany, and also in Delon’s “Borsalino and Co”, and strangely…

  • Trackdown

    Trackdown

    If after I describe the plot of Richard Heffron’s “Trackdown” it sounds familiar, that’s because it’s a cross-between both of Paul Schrader’s screenplays, “Taxi Driver” and “Hardcore”.

    Pretty teenage runaway Betsy Calhoun, played by pretty Karen (“Almost Summer”) Lamm (before she became Mrs. Dennis Wilson), gets targeted within minutes of stepping off the bus from Wyoming onto Hollywood Blvd. Pimps that staked out the Hollywood bus terminal and went shopping for young naive underage white girls as easily as they’d…

  • Manhunter

    Manhunter

    No, not the 1986 Michael Mann serial killer thriller based on Thomas Harris’ “Red Dragon”. But the 1974 Quinn Martin produced TV movie about a bounty hunter who hunts thirties era gangsters.

    Ken (White Shadow) Howard plays David Barrett, a Marine veteran returning home from World War I to his family’s small farm in the midst of the Great Depression, in what looks like it’s supposed to be Kansas. The family and the farm have fallen on hard times in…

  • Paper Moon

    Paper Moon

    The following is the ‘Paper Moon’ excerpt from an article examining John Ford’s influence on Peter Bogdanovich.

    Link to FULL ARTICLE

    Among The Movie Brats, there was a tremendous amount of John Ford adulation (Scorsese, Spielberg, Schrader and John Milius) and then there was Peter Bogdanovich.
    For one, Bogdanovich’s Ford influence extended beyond The Searchers. Peter was a true student of Ford’s filmography. And it was both his writings on and his friendship with the man, as well as many…

  • The Last Picture Show

    The Last Picture Show

    The following is the 'The Last Picture' excerpt from an article examining John Ford’s influence on Peter Bogdanovich.

    Link to FULL ARTICLE

    Among The Movie Brats, there was a tremendous amount of John Ford adulation (Scorsese, Spielberg, Schrader and John Milius) and then there was Peter Bogdanovich.
    For one, Bogdanovich’s Ford influence extended beyond The Searchers. Peter was a true student of Ford’s filmography. And it was both his writings on and his friendship with the man, as well as…

  • The Groundstar Conspiracy

    The Groundstar Conspiracy

    George Peppard was a popular leading man through the first half of the sixties. He was a genuine movie star, with genuine hits to his credit: Home from the Hill (the movie that made him a star), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (his most enduring classic, though not due to him), How the West Was Won, The Blue Max, and his biggest hit that can be attributed to him, The Carpetbaggers. Popular though he was, he never ascended to the superstar status…