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  • Minding the Gap

    Minding the Gap

    ★★★★

    "When you're a kid, you just do, you just act, and then somewhere along the line everyone loses that." - Zack

    This film fest darling chronicles the transition from adolescence into adulthood for three young men in Rockford, Illinois who share a love for skateboarding. For them it's not just a hobby, it's an escape from life's demands and a refuge from abusive fathers. The boards, bedecked with words of wisdom, act as therapy while the entire city becomes their…

  • The Nun

    The Nun

    ½

    "What's the opposite of a miracle, Father?" - Frenchie

    Catholicism sure had a rough summer.

    Billed as "the darkest chapter in the Conjuring universe," THE NUN certainly lives up to that claim, but maybe not in ways you'd expect. I'm not talking about the drab set-dressing and dim cinematography (which might actually be two of the film's bright spots). No, I'm talking about how disappointing and godawful this film is.

    Once upon the 1950s there was this computer generated monastery…

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  • Hands of Bresson

    Hands of Bresson

    ★★★★

    “The things one can express with the hands...” - Robert Bresson

    Young hands. Old hands. Clean hands. Dirty hands. Free hands. Imprisoned hands. Steady hands. Shaky hands. The hands of an alcoholic. The hands of a pickpocket. Black and white hands. Hands in color.

    You can learn a lot about a filmmaker's body of work by focusing on one part of the body. Video essayist Kogonada artfully isolates the hands at work in the films of French auteur Robert Bresson.…

  • Creepy

    Creepy

    ★★

    "Who's more charming? Your husband, or me?" - Nishino

    A former detective gets wrapped up in an unsolved case while his wife is perturbed by an off-putting neighbor in this not-so-mysterious mystery. The first act is absorbing enough as coincidence and possibility hang in balance. Unfortunately, a rolodex of fools become the biggest threat to this dwindling chronicle. Kurosawa continues to show great skill in blocking and long-takes to keep the viewer attentive; if only the script received this level of consideration. CREEPY finds occasion to live up to its name, but it could just as easily be titled CLUNKY.