Tenet

Tenet

Nolan seems to be moving away from the brief stab at cerebral melodrama that defined his early 2010s blockbusters. The result here is a film that has a similar pace and scope to INCEPTION and INTERSTELLAR, in theory, but ultimately feels more of a piece with MEMENTO — characters struggling to regain the agency stolen by their skewed perception of time. It’s the most blatantly one of his films has dealt with archetypes instead of fully-formed, conversational humans, but it’s honestly hard to imagine this another way. I may not know what I’d talk with The Protagonist, Neil and Kat about over dinner, but I’m not going to entertain the Screenwriting 101 notion of the film being inherently doomed because of that. I find their goal of controlling their own narratives a moving one — even if they can only find this catharsis through their own perspectives, their own experience with events that may lead to a far less fulfilling future from a “linear” point of view.

You could tie your brain into knots thinking about this. I doubt Nolan would have it any other way.