Weekly Roundup: Dafoe abides, Tribeca wraps, and Dedza gets radical

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With Abel Ferrera’s Siberia set for its theatrical release, Willem Dafoe talked to IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a variety of topics, including his ongoing aversion to television projects. As he says, “The definition between those two gets a little fuzzy, but the one thing that remains pretty consistent is stuff that’s narrative-based — where it’s based on writers and characters — that’s for TV. While I think cinema can do very well with those things, it can also go beyond that. It can bend time and deal with image, sound, color, all those poetic properties that are harder to define… I remain very much a person who loves to give myself to a director, doing their bidding or inhabiting what they need me to do.”


With the Tribeca Film Festival having just wrapped, RogerEbert.com’s Peter Sobczynski delivers some comprehensive reflections on both the narrative and documentary features.


On the heels of Tribeca and Cannes, Locarno will be one of the next major festivals to relaunch. They’ll do so by premiering Ferdinando Cito Filomarino’s ’70s-flavoured thriller Beckett in the iconic Piazza Grande. Artistic Director Giona A. Nazzaro comments, “There’s a piece of Locarno in the success story of Ferdinando Cito Filomarino. From the Pardi di domani to the Piazza Grande, the Locarno Film Festival is an incubator for talent, a training ground and finally as a launch pad for the most exciting filmmakers of the future.”


Writing for Hyperallergic, Ian Wang profiles Who Will Start Another Fire, an anthology of short films by emerging BIPOC filmmakers that marks the first output by Dedza Films. He appraises, “[A] trenchant nonconformity runs throughout the collection… Initiatives like this make Dedza a uniquely inclusive space, and [they] hope to continue to offer this space for radical BIPOC-centered filmmaking outside the arthouse establishment.”