"The Rougarou" by Lorraine Caffery

A ten year-old girl vows to catch and kill the Rougarou, the fabled werewolf of Louisiana lore, after the monster wreaks havoc on her neighborhood.

"The Rougarou" by Lorraine Caffery

Check out our Q&A with the filmmaker below:

Name a Horror character you relate to on a spiritual/personal level?
 
The women of Black Christmas -- the 1974 version. No one is coming to save them from Billy, and no one is coming to save us, either.
 
You’ve gotta go through some bad ideas to get to the good ones. Tell us one of your bad ideas. How do you get past the bad ones to find your spark?
 
There are no bad ideas. Only creative fodder.
 
I find the ideas with legs have a kinetic energy to them: scenes, scenarios and details populate quickly, while you’re driving, taking a shower, falling asleep. Follow this.
 
Do you consider yourself part of a horror community?
 
I do. The Horror Community is a wonderful, welcoming and brilliant group of folks. Case in point: I have a group text with a bunch of bloodsuckers I met at Overlook Film Festival (shout out Fernies!). Would that happen at a non-Genre film fest? Let’s put it this way: it hasn’t yet.  
 
When you’re building the world of your film, where do you look for inspiration?
 
I explore, examine, and interrogate Southern worlds. For this, I usually have to look no farther than my own backyard. There is a lot to be inspired by if we can do the hard work of getting personal. 
 
What would you do if you woke up inside of your film?
 
It would probably take a while to realize I was in a horror movie – and by then, it’d be too late!
 
Who would be on your ultimate horror villain squad?
 
Leatherface from the ’74 Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The virus in the ’73 Crazies. The Demons of the ’81 Evil Dead. Oh – and the Pig People from the Twilight Zone episode, Eye of the Beholder.
 
Lightning round: Freddy or Jason? Stephen King or H.P. Lovecraft? Practical or CGI? Post Apocalypse or Pre Apocalypse?
 
Angela Carter & practical.
 
How do you go about creating the props and sets for your film? How do you create objects that are relatable but unfamiliar?
 
Everything will feel relatable but unfamiliar as long as its specific.
 
But my own specificity will only take me so far – I rely on a production designer to pass go and collect the proverbial 200 dollars. Jessica Govea on the Rougarou was instrumental in building that look and atmosphere. Walking onto a dressed set after everything has been living in your head – that’s magic.
 
Additionally – there are moments in the Rougarou that feel unfamiliar but relatable for a different reason. For example: the overhead shot of the wolfprint was a Jurassic Park nod. It was by taking something everyone has seen (JP) but transmogrifying it onto a Southern Werewolf, that gave the moment its impact.
 
What scares you, and does it inspire your storytelling?
 
Ghosts, demons, possession, walking home alone at night. When I’m in the throws of writing a new story, I tend to sleep with the light on…
 
And finally, Ghostface would like to know ‘What’s your favourite scary movie?’
 
SO MANY! I’ll name a few in my canon: Black Christmas ‘73, The Evil Dead ’81, Samuel Fuller’s White Dog, Bill Gunn’s Gangja & Hess, Let the Right One In, Night of the Living Dead. I watched Raw and Saint Maud recently and – amazing. Just amazing.